Advertisement

N.B. Green Party leader raises concern over premier’s “stability” agreement proposal

Click to play video 'N.B. premier meets with opposition leaders to talk ‘stability’ agreement' N.B. premier meets with opposition leaders to talk ‘stability’ agreement
WATCH: In a meeting with party leaders, Premier Blaine Higgs said there is little appetite for an election during a pandemic. The meeting was an attempt to avoid a fall election, but Higgs is not ruling one out yet. Silas Brown has more.

The leader of New Brunswick’s Green Party says he has concerns around Premier Blaine Higgs’ proposal to try avoiding an election for up to two years.

On Monday, Higgs wrote to the four party leaders seeking a formal agreement to “not trigger an election before the fixed election date in 2022 or no earlier than thirty days following the declared end of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada, whichever comes first,” the letter read.

Any agreement would build on a supply and spending agreement to avoid instability and a formalization of the COVID-19 Cabinet Committee to ensure the parties work together to confront the coronavirus pandemic.

It would also include a mutually agreed-upon legislative agenda, including proposals from each participating party, Higgs said in the letter.

Read more: N.B. premier Higgs confirmed as Progressive Conservative party nominee

Story continues below advertisement

Green Party’s David Coon says the premier’s proposal is an “overreach” and says he has a much simpler solution.

“The goal here is to make the minority government work effectively and make sure it maintains the confidence of the house,” Coon told Global News.

“What would be the normal approach would be to meaningfully consult on the development throne speech for what priorities should be set out for the coming year, then meaningfully consult on the development of the provincial budget so that they’re written in a way that would ensure that they receive the confidence of the house,” he says.

Click to play video 'N.B. premier proposes stability agreement in order to avoid triggering election during coronavirus' N.B. premier proposes stability agreement in order to avoid triggering election during coronavirus
N.B. premier proposes stability agreement in order to avoid triggering election during coronavirus

Coon says he agrees that collaboration must be “amped up” but believes Higgs’ proposal would remove the opposition parties’ ability to hold the government accountable.

“In its present form, the way it was written in a letter to Mr. Vickers it really does ask the opposition parties to abdicate their role and MLAs to abandon their responsibility to represent their constituents in the Legislative Assembly,” he says.

Story continues below advertisement

“It’s wholly unnecessary to do that, and dangerous to do that, when there are certainly so many other ways of collaborating and cooperating,” Coon says.

Higgs told reporters on Tuesday he was disappointed to hear Coon rule out signing onto an agreement before talks had even begun.

“Well certainly the goal is we would have agreement in the house and we have four parties in the house,” Higgs said. “I’m going into this with idea that we can develop a path forward, that the province will be the winner, but I’m also going in with the idea that possibility exists that that may not happen.”

Read more: Elections New Brunswick urges residents to update voter info as election speculation continues

People’s Alliance leader Kris Austin said in a statement on Monday:

“I’m also optimistic a mutually agreed upon declaration can be made, but in the unfortunate event one cannot be reached, I still believe it is important to respect the decision of voters and allow the democratically elected legislature to continue to operate within its four year mandate.”

Liberal leader Kevin Vickers told reporters on Tuesday he is also going into talks hoping a compromise can be reached.

“I have indicated that we will keep an open mind and participate in these preliminary discussions in good faith,” Vickers said.

Story continues below advertisement