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Risk of flooding grows across northern Saskatchewan

Click to play video 'Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”' Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”
WATCH: Wet weather is increasing flood risks in northern and central Saskatchewan. – Jun 30, 2020

Wet weather has led to increased flood risk in northern Saskatchewan.

At the EB Campbell Power Station below Tobin Lake northeast of Prince Albert, flows are expected to surpass 2,000 m3/second over the next 24 hours, the province said in a press release Friday, noting the lake’s water levels are expected to rise as well.

“Residents, communities and First Nations in these areas are advised that high flows pose a safety risk and high water levels could damage property and infrastructure,” the province said in the release, warning of floating debris, unstable banks and high velocities and advising conditions can change quickly.

Read more: Influx of water from Saskatchewan prompts flood warning in Manitoba’s northwest

Closer to the Saskatchewan-Manitoba border, Reindeer Lake is being held by outflows from the Whitesand Dam.

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However, the province warns “wind is a major factor” and water levels could fluctuate. Reindeer River, to the south of the lake, is experiencing record-high flows, the province added.

In the central northern part of the province on Tuesday, Sandy Bay’s flows are expected exceed 2005 record flows of 2,300m3/s and then continue to rise, peaking at 2500m3/s or slightly higher on July 23, the province said.

In northwest Saskatchewan, high flows on the Beaver River recently peaked in the Beauval area. Lac Île-à-la-Crosse levels are expected to peak in mid-July, according to the province.

Recent rainfall in the Lac La Ronge area could drive water levels up higher than originally forecast, the province noted.

Read more: Worst flooding in over 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: ‘Our road is underwater’

In central Saskatchewan, Lake Diefenbaker’s water levels remain high, but no overflow is expected.

The Water Security Agency, public safety and in some areas, the highway ministry, continue to work with at-risk communities on flood mitigation and infrastructure protection.

Click to play video 'Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”' Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”
Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater” – Jun 30, 2020