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Rosslyn Retirement Residence in Hamilton, Ont. has licence revoked amid deadly COVID-19 outbreak

The City of Hamilton removed 52 residents from the Rosslyn Retirement Residence on May 15, 2020 after declaring a COVID-19 outbreak at the facility.
The City of Hamilton removed 52 residents from the Rosslyn Retirement Residence on May 15, 2020 after declaring a COVID-19 outbreak at the facility. Will Erskine / Global News

The retirement home that’s been the site of one of the worst COVID-19 outbreaks in Hamilton, Ont., has had its licence revoked.

In a notice posted to its website, the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority (RHRA) says it issued the order to the Rosslyn Retirement Residence following a notice of intent to revoke on June 4.

Phil Norris, RHRA manager of communications, said the regulatory body issued the revocation notice on Monday “after careful review and consideration of the information collected through inspections, complaints and reports from staff and the public.”

The home near Gage Park was evacuated last month amid a COVID-19 outbreak that infected 64 residents and 22 staff.

Fourteen of those residents have died.

READ MORE: Hamilton, Ont., reports 2 new COVID-19 cases, 14th death connected to Rosslyn retirement home

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“This has been a disruptive and extremely upsetting situation for all the residents and their families,” Norris wrote in an email to Global News. “We’re working with the City of Hamilton and other community resources to ensure residents are supported as they consider alternate housing options.”

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Current residents are not allowed to return to the home while its license is revoked, and Norris said those who are impacted will receive financial support through the RHRA’s emergency fund.

Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath called on the province on Monday to revoke the operating licences for all eight of the Hamilton retirement facilities owned by the Martino family, which includes the Rosslyn.

She described it as “a house of horrors, not a home,” with seniors living in “squalid conditions surrounded by bed bug infestations, mouse droppings and mould.”

“This must never, ever happen again,” Horwath said. “No senior should ever again have to live in a facility that puts their health, safety and well-being at risk.”

READ MORE: Four Hamilton, Ont., long-term care facilities receive infection control orders

Global News has reached out to the Rosslyn to request comment from the Martino family.

By law, the Rosslyn’s owners have the opportunity to appeal the revocation order to the Licence Appeal Tribunal and may also apply for a stay of the order.

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“We continue to monitor all retirement homes, including those owned by Martino families,” Norris said. “Where appropriate, the RHRA has issued orders and taken regulatory action, in accordance with the law.”