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Livestock research key to staying competitive: Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association

The chair of the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association said research is key to staying competitive.
The chair of the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association said research is key to staying competitive. Global Okanagan

A number of livestock and forage research projects in Saskatchewan are getting a funding boost.

The Saskatchewan and federal governments jointly announced $4.9 million in funding on Wednesday for 27 projects at the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence in Saskatoon.

READ MORE: Cattle farmers in Saskatchewan optimistic going into 2020

The chair of the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association said research is key to staying competitive.

“The partnership that this research funding represents is an important part of Saskatchewan agriculture,” Rick Toney said in a statement.

“Having governments that will invest in research along with industry groups like the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association is a key part of growing our cattle receipts and staying competitive in this global business.”

Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister David Marit said making strategic investments will help both producers and agri-businesses reach the province’s growth plan targets.

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“Research that impacts farm-level decisions, such as water quality, nutrition and animal care, can result in tangible benefits for the Saskatchewan herd as a whole,” Marit said in a release.

“The results of this year’s projects will support a sustainable, strong and growing livestock sector.”

READ MORE: Ranchers hope to beef up business as Agribition begins

The two levels of government are also jointly providing $3.2 million in funding to the centre.

“This major funding to the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence ensures that we are providing the facilities, animals and land for scientists to conduct research that is relevant to producers throughout the province,” said the centre’s director, Kris Ringwall.

Projects being supported in 2020 include strategies to address mineral nutrients in poor water quality, developing new and improved forages, and developing diagnostics supports.

Researchers will also examine cutting-edge computer tools that could help the livestock industry with genomic test data, assessing risk, and making informed therapy decisions.

“Big investments in science and research like this make a real difference in the lives of ranchers and producers,” Marie-Claude Bibeau, the federal minister of agriculture and agri-food, said in a statement.

“It creates a pipeline of new tools and practices that give our producers a competitive edge in the market.”

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Cattle farmers in Saskatchewan optimistic going into 2020
Cattle farmers in Saskatchewan optimistic going into 2020