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Humber College health sciences students take their reading week to help children in Guatemala

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WATCH ABOVE: For 10 days in February, Humber College’s nursing and paramedic students will embark on a medical mission conducting health assessments to those living in under-resourced communities in Guatemala City. Susan Hay has the story – Dec 16, 2019

Frankie Burg-Feret has been a registered nurse for more than three decades.

She’s been teaching at Humber College Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellness for 15 years. What she loves most about the Bachelor of Nursing program, is being able to lead students, in their final years, on a humanitarian trip to Guatemala.

“Often times we in the developed world we think we have all the answers,” explained Burg-Feret. “In the developing world, there is so much we can learn from them.”

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For ten days in February, Humber’s nursing and paramedic students will embark on a medical mission conducting health assessments for those living in under-resourced communities in Guatemala City.

“I really want the students to experience something where they would be able to have that mutual sharing,” said Burg-Feret.

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Equipped with training and medical kits, the team from Humber will deliver hope to 400 children and adults with minimal access to health care.

“I can speak for the people in Guatemala just because I know how eager they are for us to come,” said Burg-Feret.

Students return home with a different lens to see the world, a broader perspective, and the ability of insight.

“After going on the trip, I find that I really value human relationships that much more, “ explained Tino Minielli, a registered nurse.

“Specifically learning just how to listen to people and meeting them where they are at.”

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The primary goal of the project, now in its sixth year, is to learn cultural humility.

“I love the poor,” said Burg-Feret. “And I want my students to love the poor. I want my students to understand how important it is because we are so blessed here in Canada. We have so many resources and we should share them.”

Minielli said the children never forget his name.

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“I would just have to tell them once and then they would see me waling on the compound and they would yell out my name and say, “tino,” and that just really touched my heart. It was a life-changing trip for me for sure.”

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