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Saskatoon’s 8th urban reserve takes step forward

Saskatoon’s 8th urban reserve takes step forward
WATCH ABOVE: City and First Nation clear path to designate Saskatoon’s eighth urban reserve.

Saskatoon took a step forward in welcoming its eighth urban reserve on Tuesday.

A formal signing ceremony was held between the City of Saskatoon and Kahkewistahaw First Nation to clear a path to designate the land at 1215 Claypool Dr.

READ MORE: Sask. task group to address on-reserve gaps in First Nations’ law enforcement

Kahkewistahaw First Nation Chief Evan B.G. Taypotat said a gas station, hotel and conference centre would be built and that the economic benefits would help the city as well as support families that have suffered because of residential schools.

“There’s going to be a lot of jobs for there for First Nation youth, [and] the people of Saskatoon. For us, if we can get these kids and these people working at the jobs then they have money in their account. If they have money in their account they can do things like go to a [Saskatoon] Blades game.”
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Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark said that the employment opportunities would help at-risk youth.

“We’re spending a lot of money and resources on people just in the warehouse of the justice system,” he told Global News.

“If we can create the conditions for these young people to succeed, everybody benefits.”

Both city council and the Saskatoon board of police commissioners approved agreements with Kahkewistahaw on the municipal requirements for urban reserve designation.

“We can be proud as a community that the Kahkewistahaw First Nation saw opportunity in Saskatoon for a partnership and committed to work with the city to spur investment and opportunity,” Clark said in a press release.

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“Creating a new urban reserve in Saskatoon is a sign of strength for our city.”

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The agreements address municipal and police services the city will provide, service fees the First Nation will pay the city in lieu of property taxes, and compatible land-use and development standards.

The federal government has the final say on the decision to designate the urban reserve, city officials said.

Kahkewistahaw First Nation is located approximately 15 kilometres north of Broadview, Sask., and has roughly 2,000 members on and off-reserve.

-With files from Nathaniel Dove