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Here’s an updated timeline of the northern B.C. murders and manhunt

Click to play video: 'RCMP unable to determine motive for northern B.C. murder suspects' RCMP unable to determine motive for northern B.C. murder suspects
WATCH: RCMP unable to determine motive for northern B.C. murder suspects – Sep 27, 2019

On Friday, the RCMP released its findings after an exhaustive investigation into the three murders in northern B.C. over the summer that set off a nationwide manhunt.

READ MORE: What the investigation of the northern B.C. murders found — and what we still don’t know

Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod admitted to fatally shooting the three people and took part in a suicide pact, RCMP say video reveals.

Here is an updated timeline of the events and police investigation that spanned across western Canada.

Fort Nelson Double Homicide

July 12: McLeod and Schmegelsky leave their homes in Port Alberni, B.C. and head north.

On the same day, they legally purchase one SKS semi-automatic rifle and a box of ammunition in Nanaimo, B.C., using McLeod’s licence.

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WATCH: RCMP detail how Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky became suspects

Click to play video: 'RCMP detail how Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky became suspects' RCMP detail how Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky became suspects
RCMP detail how Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky became suspects – Sep 27, 2019

July 14: Surveillance footage shows them at a gas station in Fort Nelson.

July 15: At approximately 7:19 a.m., Fort Nelson RCMP respond to a report of two deceased persons near Highway 97 in British Columbia, about 3.5 hours north of Fort Nelson.

The two bodies are located near a blue van with an Alberta licence plate registered to Lucas Fowler, and it appeared the deaths were caused by gunshot wounds.

Meanwhile, by that time Schmegelsky and McLeod have travelled up to Whitehorse, Yukon.

READ MORE: RCMP say northern B.C. murder suspects admitted to murders on video, motive still unknown

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July 15-17: Police get a search warrant for the Fort Nelson van over the next couple of days and find identification belonging to Lucas Robertson Fowler, a 23-year-old Australian citizen, and Chynna Noel Deese, a 24-year-old American citizen. The two were on vacation together, travelling to the Yukon.

Police determine they were last seen alive the night of July 14 around 10:40 p.m.

Dease Lake Homicide

July 18: Police share the identities of the two deceased to help with the investigation that had not yet established a motive or suspect.

By now, Schmegelsky and McLeod had made their way over to Dease Lake, B.C.

WATCH: RCMP say they will not release videos of northern B.C. murder suspects

Click to play video: 'RCMP say they will not release videos of northern B.C. murder suspects' RCMP say they will not release videos of northern B.C. murder suspects
RCMP say they will not release videos of northern B.C. murder suspects – Sep 27, 2019

July 19: About 60 kilometres south of Dease Lake and 500 kilometres from the Fort Nelson murders (or a 7.5 hour drive), RCMP respond to a vehicle fire on Highway 37.

Later that day, RCMP find a deceased man about two kilometres south of the burnt vehicle, which is determined to be a Dodge pick-up truck and registered to McLeod.

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A burnt Dodge pick-up truck registered to Kam McLeod was found near Dease Lake, B.C. RCMP

A coroner believes a single bullet wound was the cause of death, and a bullet casing is found nearby that has the same markings as ones discovered at the Fort Nelson scene, effectively connecting the murders.

READ MORE: ‘This is all preventable’: Father of B.C. murder suspect questions RCMP role in manhunt

The deceased was later identified as Leonard Dyck, who was a 64-year-old botany lecturer at the University of British Columbia who left his Vancouver residence on July 16 in his silver Toyota RAV4 to go on an outdoor research trip.

Late that day, police visit McLeod’s family, who say he left with his friend Schmegelsky on a trip to northern B.C. on July 12, and that they are good kids. They are not suspects at the time.

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By this time, the two are seen in the silver RAV4 at a Kitwanga gas station, about 420 kilometres south of the Dease Lake murder scene. They later purchase a crowbar and electrical tape at a hardware store, which RCMP believe they used to change the vehicles’ appearance.

Kam Mcleod and Bryer Schmegelsky appear to have put electrical tape on the van’s hood and rear wheel to change its appearance.
Kam Mcleod and Bryer Schmegelsky appear to have put electrical tape on the van’s hood and rear wheel to change its appearance. RCMP

WATCH: How the northern B.C. murder suspects were linked to homicides

Click to play video: 'How the northern B.C. murder suspects were linked to homicides' How the northern B.C. murder suspects were linked to homicides
How the northern B.C. murder suspects were linked to homicides – Sep 27, 2019

July 20: The two are seen in Fairview, Alta., making purchases at a gas station.

July 21: McLeod and Schmegelsky arrive in Saskatchewan.

July 22: A witness who knew McLeod and Schmegelsky tell police the two may have been involved in the murders. The two teenagers now become suspects in the homicide cases.

By this time, they are observed at a McDonald’s in Thompson, Man..

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WATCH: B.C. murder suspects ‘took responsibility’ for murders in videos found with their bodies, RCMP say

Click to play video: 'B.C. murder suspects ‘took responsibility’ for murders in videos found with their bodies: RCMP' B.C. murder suspects ‘took responsibility’ for murders in videos found with their bodies: RCMP
B.C. murder suspects ‘took responsibility’ for murders in videos found with their bodies: RCMP – Sep 27, 2019

Manhunt begins

July 22: RCMP discover a burnt RAV4 in Gillam, Man. and believe it is connected to the suspects.

The burnt RAV4.
The burnt RAV4. RCMP

July 23: Manitoba RCMP alert the public the two suspects might be in the Gillam area and are considered dangerous.

That afternoon, RCMP officers search the area and an RCMP plane with infrared scans the area by night.

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READ MORE: For families linked to northern B.C. murders, there may be no closure: experts

July 24: The RAV4 is confirmed to belong to Leonard Dyck.

July 25-27: RCMP search the Gillam area, and are assisted by the Royal Canadian Air Force beginning July 27.

July 29: Several items belonging to the suspects, including ammunition, are found in the Sundance area, narrowing the search to the area.

August 1: McLeod’s backpack containing his wallet, clothing and ammunition is found.

WATCH: Burned out truck found near Dease Lake allegedly connected to BC double murder suspects

Click to play video: 'Burned out truck found near Dease Lake allegedly connected to BC double murder suspects' Burned out truck found near Dease Lake allegedly connected to BC double murder suspects
Burned out truck found near Dease Lake allegedly connected to BC double murder suspects – Jul 24, 2019

August 7: Police find two deceased bodies eight kilometres from the burnt RAV4, along with two SKS semi-automatic rifles and empty cartridges. The rifles are determined to be the same used in the homicides.

The evidence found in Manitoba.
The evidence found in Manitoba. RCMP

The search has ended.

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Videos were recovered that featured the two confessing to the three murders and saying they plan to commit suicide, according to the RCMP. They showed no remorse for the killings and had planned to find more people to kill, the RCMP report details.

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