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Close to 30 street signs in Kingston’s university district go missing

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Close to 30 street signs in Kingston’s university district are missing
WATCH: According to Public Works, 20-30 street signs within the university district area have gone missing since the beginning of September – Sep 26, 2019

The City of Kingston is working to replace 20-30 signs in the university district.

It may not be noticeable at first glance but several street signs within the Queen’s campus have disappeared.

Though its unclear where all the signs have gone, the mystery of what happened to at least one sign has been solved. This week, a video showing someone using a step ladder to remove the ‘Frontenac St.’ sign, which is bolted to a utility pole, surfaced on social media platforms including Snapchat and Instagram.

Police warn that while it may seem like fun and games to the students in the video, ripping down street signs is considered theft of city property.

READ MORE: City scrambles to fix misspelled street sign

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Kingston Police Media Relations Officer, Ash Gutheinz said anyone caught stealing signs could face criminal charges.

“If they steal an actual sign they will be charged criminally with theft under $5,000.”

According to Public Works, 20-30 street signs within the university district area have gone missing since the beginning of September.

The Director of Public Works, Bill Linnen said the thefts can add up to a significant cost.

“Depending on the sign, location and height of the sign will determine if we need traffic control or different equipment to replace the sign. Typically a sign could be as little as $100, or twice that amount depending on its location.”

READ MORE: UPDATE: Theft of road signs in Sicamous, B.C., leads town to remake Old Town Road music video

This is not the first time that multiple signs have been removed during the early months of the school year, but the questions still remain – why and where all of the stolen signs are being taken.

For the time being, Public Works is planning on replacing each sign and may potentially have to raise them even higher to avoid future incidents of theft and vandalism.

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