August 7, 2019 6:00 am

History of the ’90s podcast: Remembering the Columbine High School shootings

FILE - This April 28, 1999 file photo shows a woman standing among 15 crosses posted on a hill above Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in remembrance of the 15 people who died during a school shooting on April 20, 1999.

(AP Photo/Eric Gay, file)
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On this episode of History of the ’90s, host Kathy Kenzora takes you back to the shootings at Columbine High School. She’ll share the timeline and details from documents released by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and will talk to people who were there that day.  She also addresses some of the myths about Columbine and looks at the profound impact of one of the most tragic school shootings in U.S. history.

After the shootings started, student Laura Farber hid under a table in the cafeteria, unsure if it was real or a prank.  Farber and others eventually ran from the cafeteria into a nearby neighbourhood, banging on the front door of several houses before someone let them in to safety.

READ MORE: Columbine High School could be torn down and rebuilt, if people support that

Columbine Principal Frank DeAngelis came face-to-face with one of the shooters as he escorted a group of students into the gym change room.  Later, he would assist police outside the school as they worked to contain the situation.

While all this was happening, the world watched the drama unfold live on television.  A school shooting in the era of 24-hour news coverage created continuous coverage, leaving a permanent scar on our collective psyche.

READ MORE: Columbine school shooting: Family, friends pay tribute to victims on 20th anniversary

Immediately following the drama, the media reported that the shooters were bullied loners who were part of a group that called itself “The Trenchcoat Mafia.”  It was suggested that they were taking revenge on jocks and others who had picked on them.

Professor James Densley from the Metropolitan State University in Minnesota explains that in the years since the shooting, we have learned that this narrative was incorrect and that the notoriety given to the shooters has reared a Columbine Generation.

WATCH: (June 7, 2019) Officials considering demolishing, remodeling Columbine High School

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Contact:

Twitter: @1990spodcast

Facebook: @1990shistory

Instagram: @that90spodcast

Email: 90s@curiouscast.ca

Guests:

Laura Farber, Columbine survivor and documentary film maker – https://wearecolumbinefilm.com/ 

Twitter: @Lionessprod

Frank DeAngelis, Former Columbine Principal and Author of They Call Me “Mr. De”: The Story of Columbine’s Heart, Resilience and Recovery

Twitter: @FrankDiane72

James Densley, Professor of Criminal Justice at Metropolitan State University – https://www.jamesdensley.com/home

Twitter: @theviolencepro

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