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Trump to end asylum protections for migrants passing through other countries

WATCH: Trump to end asylum protections for migrants passing through other countries.

The Trump administration on Monday moved to end asylum protections for most Central American migrants in a major escalation of the president’s battle to tamp down the number of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

According to a new rule published in the Federal Register, asylum seekers who pass through another country first will be ineligible for asylum at the U.S. southern border. The rule, expected to go into effect Tuesday, also applies to children who have crossed the border alone.

READ MORE: Why tensions are heating up in the U.S. migrant crisis, once again

There are some exceptions: if someone has been trafficked, if the country the migrant passed through did not sign one of the major international treaties that govern how refugees are managed (though most western countries have signed them) or if an asylum seeker sought protection in a country but was denied, then a migrant could still apply for U.S. asylum.

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But the move by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration was meant to essentially end asylum protections as they now are on the southern border.

The policy is almost certain to face a legal challenge.

WATCH: Trump calls asylum claims a ‘big con job’

Trump calls asylum claims a ‘big con job’
Trump calls asylum claims a ‘big con job’

U.S. law allows refugees to request asylum when they arrive at the U.S. regardless of how they did so, but there is an exception for those who have come through a country considered to be “safe.”

But the Immigration and Nationality Act, which governs asylum law, is vague on how a country is determined “safe,” with the rules defining the concept only as it is “pursuant to a bilateral or multilateral agreement.”

Right now, the U.S. has such a provision, known as the Safe Third Country Agreement, only with Canada.

READ MORE: U.S. inches closer to allowing talks to amend Safe Third Country Agreement

Under a recent agreement with Mexico, Central American countries were considering a regional compact on the issue, but nothing has been decided. Guatemalan officials were expected in Washington on Monday, but apparently, a meeting between Trump and Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales was cancelled amid a court challenge in Guatemala over whether the country could agree to a safe third with the U.S.

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Trump administration officials say the changes are meant to close the gap between the initial asylum screening that most people pass and the final decision on asylum that most people do not win.

But immigrant rights groups, religious leaders and humanitarian groups have said the Republican administration’s policies amount to a cruel and callous effort to keep immigrants out of the country. Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are poor countries suffering from violence.

WATCH BELOW: Trump comments on photo of dead migrant, says ‘open borders means people drowning in rivers’

Trump comments on photo of dead migrant, says ‘open borders means people drowning in rivers’
Trump comments on photo of dead migrant, says ‘open borders means people drowning in rivers’

Along with the administration’s recent effort to send asylum seekers back over the border, Trump has tried to deny asylum to anyone crossing the border illegally and restrict who can claim asylum, and Attorney General William Barr recently tried to keep thousands of asylum seekers detained while their cases play out.

Nearly all of those efforts have been blocked by courts.

READ MORE: Families hide as U.S. launches small-scale immigration raids

Meanwhile, conditions have worsened for migrants who make it over the border seeking better lives. Tens of thousands of Central American migrant families cross the border each month, many claiming asylum. The numbers have increased despite Trump’s derisive rhetoric and hard-line immigration policies. Border facilities have been dangerously cramped and crowded well beyond capacity. The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog found fetid, filthy conditions for many children. And lawmakers who travelled there recently decried conditions.

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Immigration courts are backlogged by more than 800,000 cases, meaning many people won’t have their asylum claims heard for years despite more judges being hired.

People are generally eligible for asylum in the U.S. if they feared return to their home country because they would be persecuted based on race, religion, nationality or membership in a particular social group.

During the budget year for 2009, there were 35,811 asylum claims, and 8,384 were granted. During the 2018 budget year, there were 162,060 claims filed, and 13,168 were granted.

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