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Metro Vancouver’s lawn watering regulations come into effect May 1

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. File / Global News

Metro Vancouver’s lawn water regulations come into effect later this week.

Starting Wednesday, Stage 1 of Metro Vancouver’s lawn watering regulations will be enforced across the region, limiting how often you can water your lawn.

Residents are allowed to water their lawns two mornings per week, but watering trees, shrubs and flowers will be limited to mornings if they’re using a sprinkler.

The city says residences with an even-numbered address can water on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m. Residences with an odd-numbered address may water on Thursday and Sunday mornings during the same time.

Non-residential properties with an even-numbered address can water Monday mornings from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m., and Friday mornings from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m. Odd-numbered addresses can water on Tuesday and Friday mornings.

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Watering trees, shrubs and flowers is permitted for residents every day from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m. and non-residents from 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. if using a sprinkler, or any time if using hand watering or drip irrigation.

The restrictions will remain until October 15 and may shift into Stage 2 — under which residents are permitted to water two fewer days, and no non-commercial power washing is allowed — if reservoirs dip too low.

READ MORE: ‘Fingers crossed’: Flood fears recede but drought fears rise amid lower B.C. snowpack

The city says the regulations aim to conserve treated drinking water during the summer months.

WATCH: Flood fears recede but drought fears rise amid lower B.C. snowpack

Flood fears recede but drought fears rise amid lower B.C. snowpack
Flood fears recede but drought fears rise amid lower B.C. snowpack

Malcolm Brodie, Chair of Metro Vancouver’s Water Committee, said the impacts of climate change are causing longer dry spells during summertime and that everyone has to do their part to conserve water.

“Long-range climate projections show that our region can expect more than double the number of summer days above 25 degrees in the future,” he said.

“Implementing good conservation habits today will better allow us to continue to meet our region’s water needs in the future. It’s the right thing to do.”

Metro Vancouver’s drinking water supply relies on snowpack and cumulative precipitation in the three alpine lakes: Palisade, Burwell, and Loch Lomond.

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READ MORE: Despite a snowy winter, concerns have shifted from flooding to drought in B.C.

Overall consumption of drinkable water is increasing gradually as the population growth begins to exceed the per capita water reductions.

Anyone caught breaking the rules could be fined $250.