April 10, 2019 10:37 am
Updated: April 10, 2019 10:49 am

Nova Scotia PC bill would suspend licences of drivers who pass school buses illegally

A Nova Scotia MLA is proposing stronger penalties for drivers who fail to stop for school buses.

The Canadian Press/Lars Hagberg
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A Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative MLA is hoping to increase the penalty for drivers who illegally pass school buses.

Pat Dunn will be introducing the Safely to School Act on Wednesday afternoon in the legislature.

Under the bill, drivers who fail to stop for a school bus with flashing red lights will get 10 demerit points on their licence and a six-month suspension. The maximum fine will also increase to $5,000.

WATCH (Sept. 12, 2018): N.B. school district uses camera to catch drivers failing to stop for school buses

In a news release, Dunn says he hopes the increased penalty will be deterrent for drivers and ensure the safety of students. He’s calling for other parties to support the bill and pass it before the end of the session.

“Having a licence is a privilege that should not be taken lightly,” Dunn said in the release.

“We all have a role in getting our children to school safely. Those who flaunt that responsibility or are reckless with it should face substantial consequences.”

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According to the PC party, there were 1,100 reports of motorists illegally passing school buses from September 2015 to the end of February 2016.

READ MORE: Driver ticketed after school bus filled with kids rear-ended in Hammonds Plains

On Tuesday, a driver was ticketed after rear-ending a school bus with 21 children on board in Hammonds Plains.

RCMP said they believed the bus was stopped at a designated school bus stop and had its lights and stop sign activated at the time.

Nobody was injured in the incident.

READ MORE: ‘I thought the worst’ — N.B. boy recovering after being struck while boarding bus

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