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FSIN calls for more funding to make feds’ new child welfare program workable

David Pratt said they support Bill C-92, however, it needs long-term funding and implementation of UNDRIP as a framework to make a difference.
David Pratt said they support Bill C-92, however, it needs long-term funding and implementation of UNDRIP as a framework to make a difference. Phillip Bollman / Global News

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) is calling for more federal funding to make Ottawa’s proposed child welfare program workable.

The new federal legislation would give First Nations and Inuit communities jurisdiction over child welfare, which would allow them to look after their own children.

READ MORE: FSIN welcomes federal proposed changes to Indigenous child welfare system

FSIN vice-chief David Pratt said they support Bill C-92, however, it needs long-term funding and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework to make a difference.

“The child welfare reform is needed, we have over 40,000 Indigenous children in care right now,” Pratt said on March 8 in Saskatoon.

“There are more children in care, in the child welfare system, than were at the height of the residential school system. So it shows the amount of work that has to be done.”

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The Canadian government committed to spending $1.4 billion over six years for child welfare in its last budget.

FSIN is also calling on the provincial government to accept and implement Bill C-92.

In Saskatchewan, Indigenous children account for 85 per cent of the kids in care, yet they only make up 25 per cent of the child population, according to Statistics Canada.

FSIN represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan.

-With files from Global News