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Residents still waiting to return after water-line break shuts down Leader health facility

The Saskatchewan Health Authority say there were no warning signs before the water-line break at the Leader and District Integrated Healthcare Facility on Feb. 7, 2019.
The Saskatchewan Health Authority say there were no warning signs before the water-line break at the Leader and District Integrated Healthcare Facility on Feb. 7, 2019. Saskatchewan Health Authority / Supplied

UPDATE: Repairs at Leader, Sask. healthcare facility almost done

Residents of the Leader and District Integrated Healthcare Facility will likely have to wait until the end of the month before moving back in after a water-line break shut it down last week.

“We believe the cause of the flooding was a sprinkler line break due to a lack of sufficient insulation to protect it from the extremely cold temperatures,” said Derek Miller, Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) infrastructure management executive director.

The disruption forced SHA to relocate 25 long-term patients. Five are with their families, the rest are in other SHA facilities.

“We continue to check on our residents who have been relocated to their family’s homes. There is a plan in place for their medications and home care is checking up on these residents,” said Brenda Schwan, Saskatchewan Health Authority continuing care executive director.

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“At this time, everyone is comfortable and we continue to check up on them regularly.”

Miller said the break happened in a ceiling bulkhead on the long-term care side of the building causing water to enter the hallway that links to their acute care side.

While they were conducting their initial investigation, a second line burst in the same space caused by ice in the line.

“The extent of the damage includes drywall, base coats and flooring, two electrical panels and the fire sprinkler system itself,” Miller said.

“We’re also reviewing other areas of the facility to ensure there’s adequate insulation. We’ll repair any issues we encounter.”

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Right now, Miller said they’re trying to flush the sprinkler system to ensure there’s no more ice before depressurizing the lines.

SHA said they are also in talks with the building’s architect to find out if there are any other possible risks.

The cost of the damage has yet to be determined, SHA said.