Advertisement
Crime

Alberta SPCA lay more charges against man and woman involved in horse neglect investigation

Jan. 14, 2019: Several people showed up outside an Alberta courthouse on Monday, as a pair charged with upwards of 60 offences in an animal cruelty case was scheduled to appear. Albert Delitala reports.

A man and a woman who had each been previously charged by RCMP in connection with an animal cruelty investigation near Evansburg are facing more charges.

The Alberta SPCA said Tuesday it had laid charges under Alberta’s Animal Protection Act against Patricia Lynn Moore and Ross Andrew Atkinson.

The 48-year-old woman and the 50-year-old man have each been charged with 27 offences. Moore and Atkinson each face nine counts of causing an animal to be in distress, nine counts of failing to provide adequate food and water, and nine counts of failing to provide adequate care when an animal is wounded or ill.

Both individuals are scheduled to face the charges in Evansburg court on March 11.

READ MORE: Alberta man charged in animal cruelty investigation turns himself in, faces 60 more offences

In early December, a member of the public reported to the SPCA that a number of horses were in distress or dead on a property west of Edmonton, in the Evansburg area.

Story continues below advertisement

Peace officers responded and their investigation led them to a second property in the same area, the SPCA said.

READ MORE: 52 horses, 6 dogs removed from rural Alberta property connected to animal cruelty case

Moore and Atkison were previously charged by RCMP with 63 counts each of permitting and/or causing unnecessary pain, suffering, or injury to animals under the Criminal Code of Canada.

They are to appear on the federal charges on Feb. 11.

Earlier this month, RCMP officers, Alberta SPCA, a veterinarian and other officials were at an acreage near Evansburg to remove 65 horses and six dogs, police said.

WATCH BELOW: (Jan. 8, 2019) Dozens more animals have been removed from a farm west of Edmonton as part of an ongoing animal cruelty investigation. Fletcher Kent has the latest.

Dozens of animals removed from Alberta property connected to animal cruelty case
Dozens of animals removed from Alberta property connected to animal cruelty case

A spokesperson for Alberta SPCA told Global News on Tuesday its charges involve different animals.

“There was a lot of false information circulating on social media during the investigation that often became a distraction to the work of our peace officers,” Dan Kobe said in a news release.

Tweet This
Story continues below advertisement

“Our time and resources were often diverted to deal with these rumours, taking away from our ability to manage other investigations in the province.

“Proper investigations take time and often involve the gathering of forensic evidence. Our peace officers always appreciate the patience and understanding of the public when we are gathering evidence to support laying charges.”

READ MORE: Patricia Moore facing additional 60 charges in Alberta animal cruelty investigation

This is not the first time Moore has faced charges.

READ MORE: Parkland County woman Patricia Moore charged with alleged mistreatment of horses

In 2010, three horses were found dead and another 16 were seized by the SPCA from a property near Carrot Creek, Alta., which is about 60 kilometres west of Evansburg.

Moore was charged under the Animal Protection Act and was convicted of allowing an animal to be in distress as well as failing to provide adequate food and water. Moore was fined $1,500 and was prohibited from owning more than two horses for five years.

WATCH BELOW: (Jan. 8, 2019) A number of animals were removed from a rural property outside Edmonton Tuesday morning in connection with an animal cruelty case.

Animals removed from Parkland County property connected to animal cruelty case
Animals removed from Parkland County property connected to animal cruelty case
Story continues below advertisement
Global News Redesign Global News Redesign
A fresh new look for Global News is here, tell us what you think
Take a Survey

Sponsored Stories