November 27, 2018 11:06 pm

Edmonton Eskimos mourn passing of Jim Hole, former football club president

An undated file photo of former Edmonton Eskimos president Jim Hole.

Global News
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The Edmonton Eskimos issued a statement on Tuesday about the death of J.F. (Jim) Hole, the Canadian Football League team’s former president, earlier this month at the age of 91.

“The Edmonton Eskimos extend our deepest condolences to Hole’s family, friends and loved ones,” the team said in a news release.

Hole served as president of the Eskimos from 1973 through 1974.

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“[He] passed away on Nov. 15 with his family at his side and is survived by his five children, 14 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, two daughters-in-law, one grandson-in-law and two granddaughters-in-law,” the Eskimos said.

The Eskimos said Hole spent his whole life in Edmonton and was a graduate of the University of Alberta where he played football and hockey with the Golden Bears.

“His love of sport transitioned into his professional career where he served as president of the Canadian Football League and Eskimos, chairman of the Edmonton Oilers and [he] was a member of the NHL Board of Governors,” the Eskimos said. “He was honoured by the Edmonton Eskimos at Commonwealth Stadium as a builder for his contributions to the club in 2001.”

Hole was a member of the ownership group who bought the Edmonton Oilers hockey team from Peter Pocklington in the 1990s. The group later sold the team to current Oilers owner Daryl Katz.

According to his obituary, Hole was also a successful entrepreneur.

“He loved the city of Edmonton and knew that a well-rounded city needed not just sports, but arts and education,” the obituary says. “His philanthropic contributions were genuinely made for the betterment of the city and those that live in it.

“Jim was a larger than life man, both in stature and accomplishment.”

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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