June 11, 2018 10:11 am
Updated: June 12, 2018 8:59 am

Americans are saying #ThanksCanada in wake of Donald Trump’s attack on Justin Trudeau

WATCH: Chief Political Correspondent David Akin looks at what a deepening war of words, between Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau, means for trade in Canada.

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Americans are finding reasons to thank Canada after U.S. President Donald Trump and his administration attacked Canada and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau following the G7 summit in Quebec over the weekend.

Following Trump’s departure from the G7 summit on Saturday, the president launched into a multi-day tirade over trade and Canada’s response to tariffs imposed by the Trump administration.

READ MORE: Timeline of Donald Trump’s war of words (and trade) with Justin Trudeau

Trump and Trudeau have been at odds ever since the United States announced in late May that Canada will no longer be exempt from steel and aluminum tariffs, a decision that Trudeau described as “totally unacceptable.” Canada promptly announced a range of retaliatory tariffs to the tune of $16.6 billion.


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The issue of trade was the most controversial heading into the G7 summit in La Malbaie, Que., with Trump launching multiple barbs in Canada’s direction in the days leading up to his arrival.

READ MORE: Trudeau dismisses Trump quip about Canadians burning down the White House

Following Trump’s departure from the G7 summit, Trudeau said in a press conference that he told the U.S. president that his steel and aluminum tariffs were “kind of insulting,” that Canada “will not be pushed around” and that it would not hesitate to impose retaliatory measures.

WATCH: Trudeau says Canadians ‘will not be pushed around’ over U.S. tariffs

On Twitter, Trump laid into Trudeau, calling the prime minister’s behaviour “meek and mild” and accusing him of making “false statements” at his press conference. On Sunday, Trump’s economic advisor Larry Kudlow told CNN that Trudeau “stabbed us in the back” while White House trade advisor Peter Navarro told Fox News that there’s “a special place in hell” for Trudeau.”

READ MORE: Donald Trump slams ‘indignant’ Trudeau, takes aim at Canadian dairy tariffs

As the political war of words unfolded, many Americans began to point out on social media the many times Canada has helped with United States, while sharing personal stories on why they are thankful for their neighbours to the north.

WATCH: White House trade adviser Peter Navarro says there’s a “special place in hell” for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

American music writer and critic David Wild appears to have kicked off the social media initiative, by calling on his countrymen to “#ThankCanada for things we love they’ve brought to our lives.” The writer went on to thank the Great White North for musicians to the likes of Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Drake and Leonard Cohen. He also gave a shout out to SCTV and, of course, hockey.

Former American diplomat and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nicholas Burns, pointed out several instances in which Canada came to the aid of America, including Canada’s role in saving American lives during the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis.

WATCH: Question period begins with rare standing ovation from all parties in response to Trump attacks

“Canada spirited four American hostages out of Iran in 1979, welcomed thousands of stranded U.S. airline passengers on 9/11, has our back in every war, shares the world’s longest undefended border with us and a symbiotic North American economy. THE best neighbour we could have,” Burns tweeted.

Singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier thanked Canada for the government’s approach to artists.

“My travels as an artist take me into Canada several times a year. I LOVE Canada and the Canadian people. The Canadian government actively supports the arts. They do this WAY better than the US gov’t, and I am forever grateful. #ThanksCanada,” she tweeted.

Microsoft’s Ned Pyle pointed out how Canada played a significant role during the 9/11 terror attacks.

“On 9/11, thousands of Americans on 238 airliners were diverted to Canada as part of Operation Yellow Ribbon. Canada cared for them for days, The small town of Gander took in 7,000 people alone. In our hour of need, Canada was there. And this orange maggot calls them an enemy,” he tweeted.

From comedians, hockey players and musicians, to family vacations, food and historical moments, here’s a look at what some Americans are thanking Canada for.

–with files from Rahul Kalvapalle

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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