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B.C. municipal election 2018: Chase results

Rod Crowe is the new mayor of Chase, defeating incumbent Rick Berrigan and three other candidates in Saturday’s civic election.

Crowe had 256 votes, finishing just ahead of David Lepsoe, who finished with 245 votes. Berrigan finished last with 193 votes.

Incumbents Ali Maki and Steven Scott, along with newcomers Fred Torbohm and Alison Lauzon, were elected to council.

Candidates

Mayor:

Rick Berrigan (incumbent)

Rod Crowe

Harry Danyluk

Beverly Iglesias

David Lepsoe

Council:

R.J. Dunn

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Alison Lauzon

Ali Maki (incumbent)

Steven Scott (incumbent)

Fred Torbohm

Jon Walker

Stuart Wozniak

Boundary

Located on the southern end of Little Shuswap Lake, Chase is a village in the B.C. Interior that’s just under 60 kilometres east of Kamloops.

Population (2016)

2,286

History

The Secwepmc people inhabited the Chase area for millennia before European fur traders arrived in the late 1700s.

The first fur trading post was set up in Kamloops in 1812, and settlers started claiming land before the first reserves were established in 1861.

First among non-Indigenous inhabitants was Whitfield Chase, a man from New York who headed for the region amid the Cariboo gold rush.

He was a farmer who settled in the Shuswap Prairie in 1865. Chase died before the village that took his name started to develop on a townsite situated on land that an American logging company had bought from his son in 1907.

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For much of its history, logging has been Chase’s central economic driver. A mill was set up on 70 acres that were purchased from the Chase family — the facility came to be known as the Adams River Lumber Company.

The mill would come to be known as the third-biggest in B.C., and it had the highest stack in the province before it closed in 1925.

Later mills would pop up in Chase right up to 2005.

Median total income of couple economic families with children (2015)/B.C. median

$93,952/$111,736

Political representation

Federal

Mel Arnold (Conservative)

Provincial

Todd Stone (BC Liberals)