March 2, 2018 1:00 am
Updated: March 2, 2018 10:11 am

Scott Thompson: Can kids and Trump change gun laws?

U.S. President Donald Trump holds a discussion about school shootings with state governors from around the country at the White House in Washington, February 26, 2018.

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Last week in this space, after the killing of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland Florida, I asked the question, “can students instigate U.S. gun control”?

READ MORE: Can students instigate U.S. gun controls?

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Since then students have marched, rallied, protested and informed adults exactly how they feel and what they intend to do about it.

That’s sounds all warm and fuzzy but realistically how much power do they have?

READ MORE: Students caught in the Florida school shooting chronicled their trauma on social media

Apparently a lot more than the rest of the world was willing to give them credit for.

Earlier this week corporate America starting to speak with their dollars as many large U.S. companies severed ties with the National Rifle Association.

Followed by Walmart, Dick’s Sporting Goods and others who refused to sell military assault type weapons and raised the age to buy others.

And finally in a moment that stunned everyone, President Donald Trump accused other politicians of being “afraid” of the NRA,  agreeing with background checks, age restrictions, and questioning military type assault weapons.

READ MORE: ‘Take the guns first, go through due process second,’ Trump says

The Republicans in the room looked like deer caught in the crosshairs of a long gun.

Only time will tell if this does instigate real change, but it certainly is closer than they’ve ever been.

And as wacky as Trump is, he may be just the guy to get it all started.

Wouldn’t that be the deal of the century?

 Scott Thompson hosts The Scott Thompson Show on Global News Radio 900 CHML.

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