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Calgary teen ‘fight club’ videos on social media prompt warning from police

Click to play video 'Calgary teen ‘fight club’ videos on social media prompt warning from police' Calgary teen ‘fight club’ videos on social media prompt warning from police
WATCH: Calgary teen fight clubs are popping up on social media, which has sparked warnings from police as well as one mother who is urging parents to be more aware, after her son died from a single punch. Nancy Hixt reports.

Calgary teenage fight clubs are popping up on social media, prompting a warning from police.

Videos show both boys and girls fighting with crowds of other kids cheering them on.

The Instagram accounts have been removed several times but new ones keep appearing — each time with a slightly different name.

Calgary police said they aren’t aware of these particular social media accounts, but called the behaviour “extremely inappropriate and dangerous,” in a statement to Global News.

READ MORE: Alberta teen seriously injured in ‘fight club’ initiated at Spruce Grove school

Police warn even if the fights are initially consensual, charges can be laid and individuals “could find themselves in jail.”

One Calgary mother has experienced the devastating impact this kind of activity can have.

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“They are playing with fire,” Karen Venables told Global News.

Venables lost her son 15 years ago. One single sucker punch took Devin Venables’ life.

“My reaction is I literally get chest pain because it takes me back to that day when I had to come home from the hospital without Devin and I realized that one punch took his life,” Venables said.

After a night class at university one evening, 18-year-old Devin went out to meet some friends at a pub.

READ MORE: ‘Baby fight club’: Day care teacher convicted of child cruelty

“Devin was involved in a verbal altercation. He chose to walk away and the offender followed him out,” Venables explained.

“You have no idea of the ripple effect of what these actions are doing when you are standing there and fighting with someone.”

Police recommend teens interested in fighting for sport to try martial arts, boxing or mixed martial arts clubs in the city, where there is proper equipment, supervision and instruction.