July 27, 2017 6:22 pm

Plains of Abraham immerse visitors in history: Canada 150

WATCH: The Plains of Abraham in Quebec City are inviting people to discover some of the province’s history, admire artefacts and learn a few hidden secrets. As Global's Raquel Fletcher reports, it’s all part of Canada’s 150 celebrations.

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The Plains of Abraham Museum in Quebec City plays host to roughly 70,000 students every year.

In the summer, they are one of the most popular tourist destinations in the capital. This year, they’re hoping to get even more people interested in history with some Canada 150 activities.

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Visitors to the Plains of Abraham Battlefields’ Park can take a bus tour or a walking tour, where historic interpreters immerse them in the plains’ history from the get-go.

READ MORE: Canada 150: Could you pass the Canadian citizenship test?

“Abraham Martin – probably, you’ve heard the name before…That’s me,” said historic interpreter, Luc Nicole-Labrie in full character.

Abraham and his wife Marguerite arrived in New France in 1620. Every day Abraham would bring his cows to graze on the plains, hence how the eventual battle ground got its name.

According to Nicole-Labrie, most tourists come to learn more about the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, but they say there’s much more history than just the British Conquest.

At the Martello Tower, visitors use iPads to experience an augmented reality from the war of 1812.

“At that time, the British controlled the city of Quebec. The menace, the threat came from the Americans,” said Nicole-Labrie. “On three levels, you will discover how soldiers of the Royal Artillery Regiment lived there.”

The museum has also installed new exhibits for Canada 150. It hopes the themes of Canada 150 like identity, as well as British, French and First Nations history, will create an added interest in the park. Guides want to give tourists insight into the human element of the plains.

READ MORE: Wendake Pow Wow not part of Canada 150 celebrations: officials

“Of course, there were huge events that had huge impacts on kingdoms all around the world, but at the heart of that there were people,” said Nicole-Labrie. “We are very pleased if people get out of here with a good understanding of what people who were a central part of these battles truly experienced.”

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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