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Donald Trump’s ‘last night in Sweden’ comments prompt confusion, mockery

Click to play video: 'Trump appears to suggest terror incident in Sweden' Trump appears to suggest terror incident in Sweden
WATCH: United States President Donald Trump mentions Sweden in a list of countries that have experienced recent terror attacks, prompting social media comments – Feb 19, 2017

President Donald Trump confused some Swedes after mentioning their country at a rally in Florida on Saturday.

When Trump spoke about immigration, he mentioned an incident in Sweden. Trouble is, people are wondering what incident he is referring to.

“You look at what’s happening last night in Sweden. Sweden, who would believe this. Sweden. They took in large numbers. They’re having problems like they never thought possible,” Trump said.

READ MORE: Sean Spicer’s ‘Joe Trudeau’ latest in list of Trump cabinet flubs

He mentioned the incident along with cities like Paris, Brussels and Nice, which have all seen terror attacks over the past couple years.

“You look at what’s happening in Brussels. You look at what’s happening all over the world. Take a look at Nice. Take a look at Paris,” Trump said.

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WATCH: Sweden demanding explanation from the White House after Trump comments prompt confusion. Ines de La Cuetara reports.

Click to play video: 'Donald Trump’s ‘last night in Sweden’ comments prompt confusion' Donald Trump’s ‘last night in Sweden’ comments prompt confusion
Donald Trump’s ‘last night in Sweden’ comments prompt confusion – Feb 19, 2017

Swedes took to social media to question the president’s comments.

Former Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt tweeted , “Sweden? Terror attack? What has he been smoking? Questions abound.”

Aftonbladet newspaper listed in English some events that had happened Friday in Sweden, including a man who was treated for severe burns, an avalanche warning and a police chase involving a drunken driver.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Catarina Axelsson said that the government wasn’t aware of any “terror-linked major incidents.” Sweden’s Security Police said it had no reason to change the terror threat level.

“Nothing has occurred which would cause us to raise that level,” agency spokesman Karl Melin said.

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Axelsson told The Associated Press that the Swedish Embassy in Washington contacted the State Department on Sunday to request clarification of Trump’s remarks and was waiting for an answer.

One Twitter user posted a mock Ikea instruction manual on how to build a “Border Wall,” saying the pieces had been sold out.

Others seemed confused about the mention.

Trump’s comments came as he announced he is issuing a new executive order banning citizens of certain countries traveling to the United States.

READ MORE : Trump plans to ramp up deportations, expand target immigrant groups: documents

“We’ve allowed thousands and thousands of people into our country and there was no way to vet those people. There was no documentation. There was no nothing. So we’re going to keep our country safe,” Trump said.

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“We’ve allowed thousands and thousands of people into our country and there was no way to vet those people. There was no documentation. There was no nothing. So we’re going to keep our country safe,” Trump said.

The comments are the latest in a list of made up terror incidents from the Trump team.

Press secretary Sean Spicer referred to a terror attack in Atlanta during multiple interviews, but when asked to clarify which attack, he said he “clearly meant Orlando,” apparently referencing the mass shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in June.

Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway referred to the non-existent “Bowling Green Massacre” during an interview with MSNBC earlier this year.

READ MORE: Trump aid Kellyanne Conway mentioned the ‘Bowling Green massacre’ in several interviews 

It’s believed Conway was alluding to the arrests of two Iraqi citizens who lived in Bowling Green, Kentucky and were charged with terrorism-related offences in 2011.

Conway said she misspoke during the interview and meant to say “Bowling Green terrorists,” calling it an “honest mistake.”

*with files from the Associated Press, Reuters

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