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Government gives Hydro-Quebec green light for DDO transmission project

WATCH ABOVE: The Quebec government has approved Hydro-Quebec‘s plan to build new, powerful transmission lines above ground in Dollard-des-Ormeaux. Global's Navneet Pall reports.

The Quebec government has approved Hydro-Quebec‘s plan to build new, powerful transmission lines above ground in Dollard-des-Ormeaux (DDO).

READ MORE: DDO residents adding pressure to change Hydro-Quebec power line project

The public utility company had proposed to build a new substation, as well as lines with pylons that would tower above the existing ones.

The current Saint-Jean station will be converted from 120 to 315 kilovolts (kV).

READ MORE: DDO residents fight Hydro-Quebec plan to build more transmission lines

The power lines will go along de Salaberry, between Saint-Jean and Sources boulevards.

A new three-km line 315 kV will also be built next to an existing 120 kV line, reaching heights of 52 metres – dwarfing the already existing ones.

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WATCH BELOW: DDO power line information session

DDO power line information session
DDO power line information session

The West Island of Montreal Chamber of Commerce (WIMCC) welcomed the decision.

READ MORE: Information session takes place on Hydro-Quebec’s controversial DDO transmission line

“It represents an investment in the economic development of our territory,” said Joseph Huza, president and executive director of the WIMCC, in a press release.

“This project will fill the need for future growth as companies continue to choose the West Island to set up their operations.”

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In the past, Hydro-Quebec representatives have insisted the power lines are necessary to meet the West Island’s increasing demand for electricity.

WATCH BELOW: DDO residents oppose Hydro line

Quebec’s environmental board, BAPE, has already approved the project.

READ MORE: DDO residents fight Hydro-Quebec plan to build more transmission lines

The company insists burying the lines would cost far too much and could require more maintenance.

The project is estimated to cost $90 million.

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