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Shediac firefighters who rescued moose from icy river awarded by PETA

Click to play video: 'New Brunswick firefighters, RCMP rescue moose trapped in ice' New Brunswick firefighters, RCMP rescue moose trapped in ice
Shediac firefighters, RCMP and DNR helped free a stranded moose stuck in ice on the Shediac River in New Brunswick on Saturday – Dec 12, 2016

The Shediac Fire Department has been awarded by PETA for a brave rescue of a moose that had gotten stuck in ice in the Shediac River on the weekend.

PETA awarded the firefighters with the Compassionate Fire Department Award Thursday.

READ MORE: Firefighters rescue moose stuck in ice in New Brunswick river

Firefighters were called to the river Saturday morning after reports of a deer stuck in the ice. When they arrived, they found a 240-kilogram female moose.

The firefighters hacked a path through the ice, then ventured out onto the frozen river to encourage the moose in to shore, where she ran off, seemingly healthy.

“These firefighters had the determination and the know-how that it took to save this young moose from a slow, icy death,” PETA vice president Colleen O’Brien said in a release. “PETA hopes this story will inspire people everywhere to come to the aid of wildlife in need.”

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Members of the Shediac Fire Department rescue a moose stuck in ice in the Shediac River on Saturday, Dec. 10. Shediac Fire Department/Facebook
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A 240-kilogram female moose got stranded in ice in the Shediac River on Saturday, Dec. 10. Shediac Fire Department/Facebook
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Members of the Shediac Fire Department rescue a moose stuck in ice in the Shediac River on Saturday, Dec. 10. Shediac Fire Department/Facebook
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Members of the Shediac Fire Department rescue a moose stuck in ice in the Shediac River on Saturday, Dec. 10. Shediac Fire Department/Facebook

Shediac Fire Department spokesperson Julien Boudreau told Global News Thursday that PETA had contacted them to ask a few questions about the rescue and the shape of the moose after the incident. They also asked for the firefighters’ email and mailing addresses, though Boudreau “had no idea what they were up to.”

“We were surprised, we weren’t expecting it,” Boudreau said.

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“It’s certainly nice to be recognized. We certainly don’t do it for the recognition, we do it for a while host of reasons.”

READ MORE: Warning about moose licking vehicles in Kananaskis: Alberta Parks

In addition to the award, PETA is sending the fire department a box of delicious cookies, a letter of congratulations and a copy of The Engine Diet 2 — a cookbook by a Texas firefighter filled with recipes geared toward staying in firefighting shape on a plant-based diet.

Boudreau said the firefighters appreciate the gesture and will take a look at recipes in the book.

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