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TSB officials say no indication of distress call in plane crash that killed Jim Prentice

WATCH ABOVE: The Transportation Safety Board of Canada updates information on a plane crash near Kelowna, BC that killed four people including former Alberta Premier Jim Prentice. The TSB says there was no cock-pit voice recorder or a flight data recorder.

Aviation safety investigators continued to comb through the site of the plane crash that killed Jim Prentice and three others Thursday morning.

Six Transportation Safety Board investigators arrived at the crash scene Friday near Winfield, about 18 kilometres north of Kelowna.

READ MORE: Former Alberta premier Jim Prentice killed in BC plane crash

TSB spokesman Bill Yearwood said they’ll be looking at factors including pilot training, weather and the condition of the plane.

He says investigators hope to find flight any data recorders, expected to provide an update on the investigation.

Beverly Harvey, the investigator in charge, said “the aircraft was not equipped with, nor was it required to carry a cockpit voice recorder or a flight data recorder or a flight data recorder.”

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“However, the team will be reviewing any electronic components on the aircraft from which we can retrieve any data to help understand the flight profile,” Harvey said. “The initial examinations suggests the aircraft was destroyed from high deceleration forces after a vertical descent. There were no emergency or distress calls made. No emergency locator transmitter signal was received.”

Photos of the crash site were released by the TSB Saturday.

“The current site, is currently under the control of the BC Coroner Service. The TSB has been granted access to the site. There are currently five TSB investigators on this site. The coroner still has control of the site, the victims are still there,” Harvey said.

Harvey said she “would like to have this investigation completed within one year.”

READ MORE: Light rain, good visibility when plane crashed, killing former Alberta premier Jim Prentice

The aircraft, meantime, has been identified as a Cessna Citation that was built in 1974.

A preliminary Transport Canada report says it climbed to 8,600 feet before disappearing from radar.

Norjet says it will fully-co-operate with the Transportation Safety Board investigation.

WATCH: Continuing coverage of the plane crash that took four lives, including that of Jim Prentice

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The small jet was en route from Kelowna to the Springbank airport, near Calgary, when it went down shortly after takeoff Thursday night, also killing Dr. Ken Gellatly, the father-in-law of one of Prentice’s three daughters.

The family issued a statement saying it was “unbelievably painful” to lose two family members at the same time.

READ MORE: Jim Prentice’s friends Dr. Ken Gellatly, Sheldon Reid, also killed in BC plane crash

Prentice was a highly respected figure, and the tributes pouring in have focused on his ability to work on a variety of issues with people, regardless of their political alliances.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Prentice brought “deep convictions” to his work as a lawyer, business leader and politician, and was greatly respected for his intelligent, honest, and straightforward approach.

WATCH: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ‘shocked and saddened’ by the news of Jim Prentice’s death

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ‘shocked and saddened’ by the news of Jim Prentice’s death
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ‘shocked and saddened’ by the news of Jim Prentice’s death

An emotional interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose told reporters in Ottawa that Prentice was part of the Conservative family and his death is a huge loss.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, whose party solidly thumped Prentice and his provincial Tories last year, says he deeply loved Alberta and worked tirelessly.

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READ MORE: Condolences pour in following former Alberta premier Jim Prentice’s death

*with files from Global News.