September 22, 2016 6:22 pm
Updated: September 22, 2016 9:14 pm

‘These people are psychopaths’: accused paper terrorist

WATCH ABOVE: Global News is looking into the paper trail of the first person in Canada to be accused of "paper terrorism." The accused, an Alberta man, has been convicted of similar charges and even spent time in jail. Kendra Slugoski reports.

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Allen Boisjoli is responding to news that he is Canada’s first accused “paper terrorist.”

He denies he’s a Freeman on the Land and addressed the precedent-setting charge of intimidation laid by the Edmonton Police Service Wednesday in an email to Global News.

READ MORE: ‘Paper terrorism’ leads to charges against Alberta Freeman on the Land 

Watch below: A Vegreville man will appear in court later this year accused of “paper terrorism.” The man facing charges is a Freeman on the Land and as Kent Morrison reports, police say he flooded the court system with paperwork while trying to intimidate the peace officer who gave him a speeding ticket.


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“These people are psychopaths and they have no consequences for abusing their vested authority,” Boisjoli wrote.

“They’ve been trying to label me as a Freeman so that they can detract from the very real issues I bring up.”

It all stems from a May 2015 traffic stop near Edmonton for speeding.

Boisjoli, from Vegreville, Alta. recorded the exchange with the Peace Officer and posted it online.

“Do you have a reason for speeding today?” the officer asked Boisjoli in the video.

He replied that he didn’t know speeding was a crime.

“Well it’s against the law,” the officer said.

“I beg to differ,” Boisjoli replied.

The Edmonton Police Service says the Vegreville man fought the ticket and later tried to file a $225,000 lien against the officer.

While officially called “intimidation in the legal system,” police term it “paper terrorism” because Freeman pile up bogus legal arguments and documents in defence.

“We tolerated the Freeman and the sovereign citizens to a certain extent,” Edmonton police Det. Rae Gerrard said. “Now, that level of tolerance has come to an end.”

Called a “vexatious litigant” by one judge in 2012, Boisjoli is expected to defend this latest charge with more Freeman arguments.

“They see no government and no law as legitimate if they personally have not consented to it,” Geoffrey Hale of the University of Lethbridge said.

It’s estimated there are 30,000 Freeman in Canada.

READ MORE: Squatters leave home at centre of Freeman-on-the-Land dispute 

In 2013, one squatted in a Calgary home he rented, claiming it as his embassy.

Last June, another man with Freeman ties shot and killed an Edmonton police officer before killing himself.

READ MORE: Edmonton police Const. Daniel Woodall, 35, killed in west-end shooting 

That danger is why Ron Usher of The Society of Notaries Public of B.C. has sent warnings to members not to notarize documents written by Freeman.

“It’s a concern. We’ve coached our notaries in British Columbia very carefully on this. Call 911.”

But Freeman say they do not preach violence.

Rob Menard is the founder of the World Freeman Society and says they’re only fighting for their rights.

“If merely doing that means that you end up being charged with paper terrorism, I think that’s a little bit wrong.”

Boisjoli’s due back in court Nov. 7.

Court records show Allen Nelson Boisjoli has past convictions for offences including intimidation or attempt to intimidate by threats and assault or intent to resist arrest. He was convicted of those offences in 2013 and given a 10-year firearms ban in addition to being sentenced to 10-and-a-half months in jail and three years of probation.

Boisjoli has also been previously convicted of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle and possession of stolen property. He has also faced harassment charges in the past but those charges were later withdrawn.

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc

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