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‘Like the whore you are’: Video highlights abuse females face online

Click to play video: 'Female sports reporters put face to victims of online abuse' Female sports reporters put face to victims of online abuse
WATCH: Two respected sports reporters have decided to confront the issue of online abuse head on, after a slew vile insults directed at them on social media. Jennifer Tryon has the story – Apr 27, 2016

WARNING: GRAPHIC LANGUAGE

Would you say to someone’s face the things you would post about them on the Internet?

Sarah Spain and Julie DiCaro are women working in the sports industry. A new video provides a jarring look at some of the feedback they receive online, with men reading to their faces online comments about them.

READ MORE: Majority of employees don’t report sexual harassment in workplace: Poll

“One of the players should beat you to death with their hockey stick…” one man says, as he trails off.

“Like the whore you are,” another reads aloud.

The men reading the tweets out loud are not the ones who wrote and sent them; they were simply told they’d be reading “mean” comments to the women’s faces.

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The messages get dark very quickly.

“This is why we don’t hire any females unless we need our c**ks sucked or our food cooked,” one man reads out hesitantly, appearing uncomfortable.

“There’s a lot of C-word,” another man says, as he looks through the messages.

WATCH: Full #MoreThanMean video — DISCRETION ADVISED

The women involved, who the messages were originally directed toward online, had read the messages before filming began.

READ MORE: Internet trolls are winning the war: Former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao

“Hopefully this skank Julie DiCaro is Bill Cosby’s next victim, that would be classic,” says one message. Another commenter wrote they hope DiCaro, who has spoken out about being sexually assaulted, gets “raped again.”

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The video was put together to start a conversation about the anonymous abuse women in sports face online “just for doing their jobs,” with hashtag #MoreThanMean.

“Harassment…has been proven to have long-lasting emotional effects,” says Stacey Forrester, the organizer of Vancouver’s Hollaback! movement, in an email to Global News.

“It can result in people limiting their participation in civic, academic, political or other aspects of day to day public life.”

READ MORE: B.C. man’s revenge site prompts legal debate

Australian research found that nearly half of women have experiences harassment online; a Pew Research study found that number to be even higher, with 73 per cent of adults reporting having been harassed online.
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Online comments can’t be dismissed as “just words” when a person is being subjected to rape, violence and even death threats while at work, Forrester says.
“In many ways the anonymity of online harassment can be scarier — you can’t see the person to know how to best act to protect your safety,” Forrester says.
“Imagine a man you know nothing about expresses a desire to kill, rape or harm you? How do dismiss that?”
She encourages people to speak out about their own experiences with harassment. She recommends Heartmob, an alternative reporting system, for people to report online harassment and seek support.
“All members of our community deserve to move through life… free of harassment and threats of violence.”
Watch below: A video that shows men reading tweets to female sport reporters is making waves for the way it shines the light on online harassment. Emily Mertz explains. WARNING: Graphic content.
Click to play video: '#MoreThanMean tweets read to female sport reporters' #MoreThanMean tweets read to female sport reporters
#MoreThanMean tweets read to female sport reporters – Apr 27, 2016

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