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Ontario ‘substantially interfered’ with teachers’ bargaining rights: court

Sam Hammond, president of the Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario responds to Education Minister Laurel Broten's comments in Toronto, Ont. Thursday, April 12/2012.
Sam Hammond, president of the Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario responds to Education Minister Laurel Broten's comments in Toronto, Ont. Thursday, April 12/2012. Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

TORONTO — An Ontario judge has found that the provincial government “substantially interfered” with teachers’ right to collective bargaining.

The governing Liberals imposed contracts on teachers in 2012 that froze some of their wages and limited their ability to strike.

Several unions took the government to court, arguing that Bill 115 violated their constitutional rights.

READ MORE: Ontario elementary teachers ratify new labour agreement with province

Ontario Superior Court Judge Thomas Lederer issued his decision today, ruling in favour of the unions.

Sam Hammond, the president of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, says the decision “is a total vindication” of the union’s “pursuit of democratic rights.”

Paul Elliott, president of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation, says he is pleased the court “re-confirmed the importance of free, fair and meaningful collective bargaining.”

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