November 8, 2015 3:28 pm

This week on Focus Montreal: Nov. 7

WATCH ABOVE: From the unveiling of a new cabinet, to a group who wants to put tolls on all bridges and tunnels leading to Montreal and how monster bosses can negatively impact the workplace, look who we’re meeting this week on Focus Montreal.

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MONTREAL — Focus Montreal introduces Montrealers to people who are shaping our community, bringing their stories into focus.

It airs on Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and on Sunday at 7:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and at midnight.

Take a look at who we’re meeting this week on Focus Montreal:


Bruce Hicks on Canada’s new Liberal cabinet

Justin Trudeau launched a new Liberal era in Canada on Wednesday.

He unveiled a cabinet with mostly fresh faces, parity between men and women and the most diverse line-up of ministers in Canadian history.

After more than a decade of having just a few voices in cabinet, seven of the 31 cabinet postings are now in the hands of Quebecers.

 Senior Anchor Jamie Orchard sat down with political scientist Bruce Hicks to talk about the new cabinet.



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Monster Bosses

If a new survey from Monster Canada is right, many, many of you will relate to our next story.

The study shows nearly half of Canadians have left a job because they have a horrible boss.

The survey sums up the top 5 scariest bosses you can come across from the overbearing micro-manager to the glory hog who takes the credit for anything and everything.

The Canadian content manager for Monster Canada, Arturo Garcia Gallo, discusses the findings and the impact bad bosses can have in the workplace.


Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission report

It’s not a very popular idea, but one Canadian think tank is suggesting Montreal should add tolls to every bridge and tunnel leading to the island.

The report conducted by Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission says targeted tolls at rush hour could help ease traffic congestion.

The idea has certainly worked in other cities in the world, with tolls encouraging commuters to use different modes of transportation.

The Quebec commissioner of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission, Paul Lanoie, explains how congestion pricing policies work.

© 2015 Shaw Media

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