March 14, 2014 5:16 pm
Updated: March 14, 2014 9:57 pm

St. Paddy’s Day makes March a big month for beer, right? Wrong

In anticipation of the match, which takes place at 4 p.m. Sochi time, many provinces have eased restrictions on alcohol service.

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Blonde, amber, pale or Irish, chances are a lot of Canadians will be downing suds this weekend to celebrate St. Patrick.

But that doesn’t make March a banner month for beer.

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Statistics from Beer Canada reveal that March is actually the third-lowest beer-consuming month of the year, closely followed by February and January. Beer Canada wasn’t available Friday to discuss why that’s the case, but it could be as simple as patio season: Hot days mean thirstier patrons and more beer sold, according to the Liquor Control Board of Ontario’s Chris Layton.

According to The Conference Board of Canada, beer is the first-choice alcoholic beverage for Canadians and its popularity supports 1 out of every 100 jobs in the country. It accounts for over 8 per cent of spending on food and beverages per household every year and each dollar spent on beer generates $1.12 for the Canadian economy.

Some more sudsy factoids:

BeerBreakdown (Conflict Copy) (3)

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