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IN PHOTOS: Eclipse watchers across North America react with cheers, awe

Click to play video: 'Solar Eclipse: Timelapse videos capture surreal moments of darkness during celestial event'
Solar Eclipse: Timelapse videos capture surreal moments of darkness during celestial event
WATCH: Solar Eclipse: Timelapse videos capture surreal moments of darkness during celestial event – Apr 8, 2024

Millions of people from Mexico to Newfoundland and Labrador gazed upward as a total solar eclipse crossed North America on Monday, darkening skies and creating a once-in-a-generation moment for those in the path of totality.

When the eclipse arrived, most watched in stunned silence, with some smiling or gaping in astonishment. Others openly cheered as they witnessed the event, which won’t be repeated in North America until 2045.

People use special glasses to watch a total solar eclipse in Mazatlan, Mexico, Monday, April 8, 2023. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano).
Isabel Franco, left, and her parrot Alex watch a solar eclipse from Griffith Observatory on Monday, April 8, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Andy Bao).
Didier Timothy-Mondesir watches the solar eclipse from Prince Edward County, Ont., Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick.
Restaurant workers in the Flatiron district of Manhattan take a break to view the solar eclipse, Monday, April 8, 2024, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo).
People react to totality occurring during the total solar eclipse at Parc Jean Drapeau, in Montreal, Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz.
Skywatchers experience the total solar eclipse in Fredericton, Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese.

The eclipse provided a perfect excuse for politicians in Canada and the United States to take a break from their work.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was spotted taking in the spectacle from the roof of the building that houses the Prime Minister’s Office. Dozens of elected officials, including Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, gathered on Parliament Hill to crane their necks skyward.

U.S. President Joe Biden was seen by reporters clutching a pair of eclipse glasses as he boarded Air Force One in Madison, Wisc., but the president did not stop to look up at the sky.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes in the solar eclipse from the roof of the Office of the Prime Minister and Privy Council building, Monday, April 8, 2024 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld. ajw
Deputy Speaker of the House Chris d’Entremont tries out a pair of protective glasses outside Parliament, in Ottawa, Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld.
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., wears eclipse glasses as he views the moon partially covering the sun during a total solar eclipse, in front of the U.S. Senate on Capitol Hill, Monday, April 8, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon).

The eclipse also interrupted pre-tournament play at the Masters in Augusta, Ga., casting a shadow over the course and forcing the the lights on at the driving range.

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Wearing specially branded Masters glasses, spectators turned their attention from golf’s stars to the heavens before getting back to the practice rounds. Some players were also wearing eclipse glasses on the course and took a moment to gaze upward.

Tom Kim, left, of South Korea, watches Sam Burns putt as Burns wears solar eclipse glasses on 16th hole during a practice round in preparation for the Masters golf tournament at Augusta National Golf Club Monday, April 8, 2024, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis).
Xeve Perez looks up as the sun during an solar solar eclipse during a practice round in preparation for the Masters golf tournament at Augusta National Golf Club Monday, April 8, 2024, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/George Walker IV).
A patron look up at the sun during an solar eclipse during a practice round in preparation for the Masters golf tournament at Augusta National Golf Club Monday, April 8, 2024, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum).

At viewing parties and gatherings across the continent, people wore unique outfits and viewing gear to catch a glimpse of the eclipse.

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Some used homemade peephole viewers made of cardboard or cereal boxes, while photographers rigged together special gear to capture images of the moment the moon blocked out the sun.

People watch the solar eclipse at Parc Jean Drapeau, in Montreal, Monday, April 8, 2024. CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz.
Guillaume Jordin checks out a pinhole camera to watch the total solar eclipse at Parc Jean Drapeau, in Montreal, Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz.
Chris Kuhn, of Yarmouth, Maine, wears a Teletubbies costume while watching the eclipse on the Appalachian Trail near the summit of Saddleback Mountain, Monday, April 8, 2024, near Rangeley, Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty).
Mackenzie Trumbull, left, and Kathy Trumbull pose for a picture as they gather to watch as the moon partially covers the sun during a total solar eclipse, as seen from at National Mall in Washington, Monday, April 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana).

Families made sure babies and young children — and even pets — were properly protected in order to safely take a peek.

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Yurem Rodriquez watches as the moon partially covers the sun during a total solar eclipse, as seen from Eagle Pass, Texas, Monday, April 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Eric Gay).
Jason Epstein and his two year old daughter Scarlett Epstein use a welder’s mask to watch the progress of the total solar eclipse at Verona Beach, N.Y., Monday, April 8, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christinne Muschi.
Igor’s owner, Mika Barzilay, not in picture, puts eclipse glasses on the snoozing dog for a photograph while waiting the solar eclipse Monday, April 8, 2024 at Zilker Metropolitan Park in Austin, Texas. The pair with Barzilay’s friend drove from Houston at 4 a.m. for viewing of the eclipse. (Yi-Chin Lee/Houston Chronicle via AP).

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