November 27, 2014 8:40 pm
Updated: December 3, 2014 11:29 am

Premiers Wynne, Prentice agree to meet to discuss Energy East pipeline project

The Energy East pipeline proposed route is pictured as TransCanada officials speak during a news conference in Calgary, on Aug. 1, 2013.

Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

TORONTO – Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says she and Alberta Premier Jim Prentice agree concerns raised by Central Canada over the Energy East pipeline project cannot deteriorate into “an east versus west” debate.

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Wynne and Prentice talked briefly today to discuss the seven principles that Ontario and Quebec say they want considered in the approval process for the proposed $12 billion pipeline, which would carry western crude to refineries in eastern Canada. Wynne says she and Prentice agreed to meet next week in Toronto to talk about environmental protections for the pipeline and other
concerns from Ontario and Quebec that she insists are not conditions, but issues that must be addressed.

READ MORE: TransCanada documents on Energy East PR tactics raise concerns 

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard and Wynne agreed last week on a list of seven principles for the Energy East project after a joint cabinet meeting.

The Saskatchewan legislature passed a motion Wednesday calling on Ontario and Quebec to recognize the National Energy Board as the appropriate body to review the pipeline proposal, and Wynne says she agrees.

She says Ontario will gather feedback on the pipeline and provide it to the NEB review for Energy East, which she vows the province will not try to block.

READ MORE: Application filed for Energy East pipeline 

“There are Ontario industries that are completely dependent on the oilsands in Alberta,” she said. “We are in this together.”

The Ontario and Alberta premiers also made a friendly wager on this weekend’s Grey Cup game, with Wynne promising to wear a Stampeders jersey if Calgary wins, while Prentice will have to don a Tiger Cats sweater if Hamilton is victorious.

© 2014 The Canadian Press

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