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Water-purification unit from Canada arrives in typhoon ravaged village

Video: Victims of Typhoon Haiyan finally got some clean water to drink courtesy of Canada’s disaster relief team, nearly two weeks after the storm struck the Philippines. Stuart Greer reports.

TORONTO – A much-anticipated water purification unit from Canada has arrived to the typhoon hit village of Cabugcabug in the Philippines.

The ROWPU – or Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit – can turn even the filthiest and most contaminated water into a safe and clean drinking source.

Set up and maintained by the Water Production Detachment of the DART Engineer Troop, the ROWPU can purify up to 50,000 litres of drinking water per day and 5,000 litres an hour.

GALLERY: Canada purifying water in Philippines

A water-purfication unit arrives from Canada to the village of Cabugcabug, 2 hours east of Roxas, in the Philippines on Tuesday November 19, 2013. The village’s mayor says there hasn’t been any power and barely any drinking water since the typhoon hit. Stuart Greer/Global News
A water-purfication unit arrives from Canada to the village of Cabugcabug, 2 hours east of Roxas, in the Philippines on Tuesday November 19, 2013. The village’s mayor says there hasn’t been any power and barely any drinking water since the typhoon hit. Stuart Greer/Global News
A water-purfication unit arrives from Canada to the village of Cabugcabug, 2 hours east of Roxas, in the Philippines on Tuesday November 19, 2013. The village’s mayor says there hasn’t been any power and barely any drinking water since the typhoon hit. Stuart Greer/Global News
A water-purfication unit arrives from Canada to the village of Cabugcabug, 2 hours east of Roxas, in the Philippines on Tuesday November 19, 2013. The village’s mayor says there hasn’t been any power and barely any drinking water since the typhoon hit. Stuart Greer/Global News

Engineers moved the purification unit out to the village of Cabugcabug, located 2 hours east of Roxas, where conditions are starting to grow dire.

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The village’s mayor said there hasn’t been any power and barely any drinking water since Typhoon Haiyan hit almost two weeks ago.

READ MORE: Canadian medics overwhelmed with displaced typhoon survivors

“Canadians can be proud of the speed with which their Canadian Armed Forces have responded to this tragic situation,” said General Tom Lawson, chief of the defence staff of the Canadian Armed Forces, in a press release Friday. “The people of the Philippines need help, and on behalf of Canada, we’re providing it.”

On Monday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Canada will contribute another $15 million for humanitarian relief in the Philippines, bringing the total to $20 million.

READ MORE: Harper announces another $15M for Philippine relief

Harper made the announcement during a visit to Toronto where he met members of the Filipino-Canadian community.

– with files from Stuart Greer, Global News

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