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Manitoba announces $200M plan to add 2K health-care professionals

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Manitoba announces $200M plan to add 2K health-care professionals
The Manitoba government aims to end mandated overtime for health-care professionals with a $200 million plan to add 2,000 staff to the province’s health care system – Nov 10, 2022

The Manitoba government aims to end mandated overtime for health-care professionals with a $200 million plan to add 2,000 staff to the province’s health care system.

Manitoba premier Heather Stefanson was joined by health minister Audrey Gordon to announce the “health human resource action plan” Thursday afternoon.

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“This action plan is a critical turning point to address Manitoba’s health human resource challenges _ something all jurisdictions across the country are facing,” Premier Heather Stefanson said.

The plan will focus on retaining, training, and recruiting health-care staff across the province, Stefanson said.

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The effort to retain staff will include adding an additional hourly premium for staff working on weekends, additional pay for nurses who occupy a full-time equivalent positions, as well as a commitment to reimburse  Manitoba health-care professionals for their annual professional licensing fees.

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The training aspect includes expanding the undergraduate nurse program to include returning nurses from retirement and internationally educated nurses, and increasing intake for nurse and doctor education.

Efforts to recruit health-care professionals to Manitoba will include offering a financial incentive for publicly funded nurses who refer a returning agency nurse, financial incentives for returning nurses, and tuition rebate for full-time nurses.

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There will also be more money for personal protective equipment and mental-health services, the province said, as well as more peace officers stationed at large emergency departments to ensure a safe work environment.

The government is also going offer money to help medical clinics and doctors’ offices expand their hours.

The initiatives “will be rolled out as they are finalized” the province said in a release, and Gordon said details of the payment amounts still have to be worked out.

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The group Doctors Manitoba said it is encouraged by the plan, which it says will begin to address concerns about burnout that emerged during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Manitobans are facing unreasonably long wait times in emergency rooms and for surgeries and diagnostic tests,” said Dr. Candace Bradshaw, president of Doctors Manitoba, which represents some 4,000 physicians, residents and medical students.

“Rural and northern hospitals are facing frequent closures and making it hard to know when and where to access care. The causes of these problems are complicated, but often they all come back to one single common issue, and that is shortages and burnout among our health care workers.”

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The Manitoba Nurses Union said the money is a start.

“This announcement is a good first step in helping to improve the terrible conditions for Manitoba nurses at present. However, there is still plenty of work to do,”
union president Darlene Jackson said in a written statement.

The pandemic has caused wait times at Manitoba hospitals to grow. The amount of people in intensive care remains above the pre-pandemic normal capacity, government data indicate.

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At one point last year, dozens of intensive-care patients were flown to other provinces to free up beds.

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The backlog of surgeries and diagnostic times has increased during the pandemic and a recent surge in respiratory viruses prompted a warning at the children’s hospital in Winnipeg this week that children with less urgent symptoms are facing longer waits.

Details of each new financial incentive have yet to be worked out and the $200 million is to be spread out over multiple years in a health system that costs $6.7 billion annually.

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Some health workers were not convinced the money will be enough.

“Rural paramedics, laboratory and diagnostic imaging technologists, respiratory therapists and so many others are taking early retirement, leaving for other provinces where they can earn more or leaving health care altogether,” Jason Linklater, president of the Manitoba Association of Health Care Professionals, said in a news release.

“If they really want to give the front line hope, then our members need more details and substantive action now.”

–With files from Steve Lambert at The Canadian Press

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