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Saskatoon pharmacy looking to tackle kid’s Advil, Tylenol shortage

Click to play video: 'Saskatoon pharmacy looking to tackle kid’s Advil, Tylenol shortage'
Saskatoon pharmacy looking to tackle kid’s Advil, Tylenol shortage
Nanogram is the first Saskatchewan pharmacy to sign on to the service – Oct 4, 2022

Saskatoon’s Nanogram Pharmacy and Alberta pharma tech company, KemNet Inc., have teamed up to tackle the ongoing shortage of children’s Advil and Tylenol in Saskatchewan.

Their goal is to provide Saskatchewan residents with easy access to the popular kids’ medication through a new online ordering platform by KemNet.

Read more: Children’s medicine shortage leaving some Sask. pharmacy shelves bare

“Many of the phone calls that come into our pharmacy are from parents who have run out of acetaminophen (Tylenol) or have heard about the shortage,” says Stephanie Yeboah, the manager at Nanogram Pharmacy.

The shortage comes at a particularly challenging time of year.

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“Parents are really concerned now that school has started again. Doctors are asking questions too, as are pharmacies.”

Click to play video: 'Children’s Tylenol and Advil shortage makes its way to Saskatchewan'
Children’s Tylenol and Advil shortage makes its way to Saskatchewan

The specialty compounding pharmacy provides drug compounding services for fertility, hormone, skin, pain medications and animals. Nanogram says it can now fill doctors’ prescriptions for children’s Tylenol and Advil that are being placed on KemNet’s system.

Drug compounding is the process where a pharmacist combines, mixes or alters ingredients to create a customized drug for an individual user.

“We’ve been seeing more cough, cold and respiratory issues over the summer and that’s unusual,” says Yeboah. “Now, with kids back to school, we’re entering the cold and flu season so we’ll see demand picking up even more.”

Read more: Some kids’ painkillers in short supply, but pharmacists say prescription not needed

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KemNet, the pharmacy software platform, started in Alberta in August. Founder and CEO Morenike Oladsebikan says its facility in Edmonton began stockpiling ingredients needed to supply these meds after learning about the shortage.

“Once we learned of the acute need for these children’s medications, we responded immediately,” says Oladsebikan, who’s been a clinical pharmacist for a decade.

Click to play video: 'Alberta pharmacies dealing with shortage of some children’s medication'
Alberta pharmacies dealing with shortage of some children’s medication

The release says while children’s Tylenol and Advil are normally available without prescription, these compounded versions require one.

“Once a customer completes a brief online information form, pharmacies can typically deliver the medication they need within 24 hours,” says Oladsebikan.

Nanogram is the first Saskatchewan pharmacy to sign on to the service.

Read more: Saskatchewan COVID-19 viral load drops after notable peak

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“We get the acetaminophen, Tylenol powder, or the ibuprofen, Advil power, and we would make the suspension from scratch,” says Yeboah.

“We literally would have the surf basis and the flavours and that, and we’d literally create a product that is extremely similar.”

She says this partnership gives people somewhere to reach out, either through her pharmacy or on KemNet’s website.

“This gives them an easy option if they can’t find the product they’re looking for,” says Yeboah. “They can get in touch with us and we can help them source it or we can compound it if necessary.”

Yeboah adds this service doesn’t just apply to Saskatoon.

“You’re going to be waiting that two or three days to get the medication to your location depending on where you live, but Saskatoon we can definitely have it done the same day.”

She wants parents to know that the shortage won’t last forever, but in the meantime, there is an alternative.

“When it does come back in stock, we can’t compound it anymore. So when it comes back in stock, parents will just purchase it off the shelf like they did before.” concludes Yeboah.

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