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Fiona: Schools closed, some asked not to visit ERs as clean-up continues

Click to play video: 'Storm Fiona: Hundreds of thousands of NS Power customers still in dark'
Storm Fiona: Hundreds of thousands of NS Power customers still in dark
Nova Scotians are taking stock of the damage that was caused by the winds from post-tropical storm Fiona. Hundreds of thousands of Nova Scotia Power customers remain off the grid. Graeme Benjamin reports – Sep 25, 2022

As the clean-up from post-tropical storm Fiona’s damage continues in Nova Scotia, some cancellations and closures are stretching into the week.

The damaging storm barreled through Atlantic Canada Friday night into Saturday, causing widespread power outages and unsafe conditions.

Read more: After the storm - residents of Atlantic Canada and eastern Quebec survey damage

Public school classes are cancelled Monday for schools in:

  • Halifax Regional Centre for Education
  • Cape Breton-Victoria Regional Centre for Education
  • Strait Regional Centre for Education
  • Chignecto-Central Regional Centre for Education
  • Conseil scolaire acadien provincial schools (CSAP) in its northern and metro groups

The province said the cancellations are due to power outage and unsafe road conditions, and was the result of a recommendation from the provincial Emergency Management Office.

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Officials will be checking all schools to make sure that buildings and properties are safe before students and staff return.

School staff in Annapolis Valley Regional Centre for Education, South Shore Regional Centre for Education, Tri-County Regional Centre for Education and CSAP schools in its south group will reach out to families later Sunday about cancellations at individual schools.

Those who can wait asked not to go to ERs

Meanwhile, Nova Scotia Health is asking anyone who can “wait” to refrain from visiting the province’s emergency departments.

“Our emergency departments around the province are busy,” NSH said in a news release.

Click to play video: 'Day after Fiona: Eastern Canada takes stock of post-storm damage as conditions ease'
Day after Fiona: Eastern Canada takes stock of post-storm damage as conditions ease

They add that anyone who is registered with the Need a Family Practice registry, which is for people without a family doctor, can use VirtualCareNS.

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“We understand that power and network issues are affecting many in the province,” the release noted.

People who are on home oxygen and those who need power for medical devices are asked to go to Comfort Centres, and not the ER, in the event of a power outage.

Comfort Centres in the Halifax Regional Municipality on Sunday include:

  • Beaver Bank Kinsac Community Centre, 1583 Beaver Bank Road, Beaver Bank | 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Royal Canadian Legion Branch #58, 23566 Nova Scotia Trunk 7, Sheet Harbour | 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Prospect Road Community Centre, 2141 Prospect Road, Hatchet Lake | 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Moser River Community Hall, 28975 Highway 7 | 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Eastern Shore Community Center (Musquodoboit Harbour Arena), 67 Park Road, Musquodoboit Harbour | 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Fairview Family Resource Centre, 6 Titus Street | 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Fire Station 62, 2417 Old Sambro Road | 2 p.m. to 9 p.m.

NS Health said decisions will be made later Sunday on the ability to go ahead with scheduled outpatient care and services.

“Please do not attend scheduled appointments for care if it is unsafe for you to travel,” the release read.

Anyone with urgent medical needs should call 911. General health advice is available 24/7 from registered nurses at 811.

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NS Health went on to ask people who are waiting in traffic for coffee shops and gas stations, not to block access to hospital sites or the pathways of emergency vehicles.

It was a reminder echoed by RCMP.

“We know you want your Tim’s or your McD’s but please, if you can, wait at home just a big longer,” police wrote in a tweet.

RCMP said traffic woes were resulting in additional calls to police dispatchers “who are already handling very high call volumes.”

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