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Updated interpretive centre at FortWhyte Alive to help meet green goals

Canadian Geese gathered at Fort Whyte Alive in Winnipeg. Zahra Premji / Global News

A newly retrofitted interpretive centre at FortWhyte Alive is intended to help the Manitoba nature oasis achieve its green goals.

The newly-updated Richardson Interpretive Centre has undergone a ‘deep energy retrofit’, FortWhyte Alive said, after decades of being hammered by Winnipeg’s harsh weather had taken a toll on the building’s efficiency.

The updates, which include fossil fuel-free geothermal systems and an energy recovery ventilator, have reduced FortWhyte’s electricity consumption by 36 per cent.

“We are thrilled to welcome people back to this space and highlight how integral it is to not only invest in environmental education for the next generation but to also invest in climate-resilient building practices,” said FortWhyte Alive president Liz Wilson.

“Leading by example, we hope to inspire others to take action.”

Read more: Winnipeg’s FortWhyte Alive gets $8.5M from province

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The retrofit, part of the multi-year FortWhyte Forever development program, was made possible by funding from both the federal and provincial governments, to the tune of more than $4 million apiece, as well as a contribution from the Richardson Foundation.

“The Richardson Interpretive Centre allows Winnipeggers and people from across Canada to experience Southern Manitoba’s vast and unique natural environment,” said Winnipeg South Centre MP Jim Carr.

“Through these retrofits, visitors will enjoy a state-of-the-art facility that embodies FortWhyte Alive’s mission of educating people about nature and environmental stewardship.”

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