Advertisement

B.C. landmarks light up in support of Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day

The sails at Canada Place were lit up in pink and blue Thursday night in support of Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. Canada Place Twitter

A record number of landmarks around B.C. are lighting up Friday in support of bereaved parents and Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day.

Oct. 15 is a day that aims to raise awareness and support for those who have suffered the death of a child, either before birth or after birth.

This year, according to the B.C. Childloss Support Network, a record number of landmarks will be lighting up in pink and blue.

Read more: ‘Every parent’s worst nightmare’: Breaking the silence on stillbirths

The landmarks include:

  • BC Place Stadium
  • Vancouver City Hall
  • Vancouver’s Burrard Street Bridge
  • Coquitlam Pillars
  • Victoria Street Bridge in Trail
  • Whistler’s Fitzsimmons Creek Bridge
  • Surrey Civic Plaza
  • Squamish Wave of Light
  • Port Moody City Hall

In addition, Vancouver’s Science World, and the Sails at Canada Place were lit up on Thursday evening, ahead of the day.

Story continues below advertisement
Click to play video: '#UnsilenceTheConversation: Reducing the stigma around pregnancy and infant loss' #UnsilenceTheConversation: Reducing the stigma around pregnancy and infant loss
#UnsilenceTheConversation: Reducing the stigma around pregnancy and infant loss – Jul 11, 2021

Story continues below advertisement

There are also a number of events planned across B.C. and Canada Friday and over the weekend that will give parents and caregivers the chance to come together and find support.

Click to play video: 'Infant loss, Down syndrome awareness near and dear to Vancouver mother' Infant loss, Down syndrome awareness near and dear to Vancouver mother
Infant loss, Down syndrome awareness near and dear to Vancouver mother – Oct 22, 2020

In addition, the University School of Nursing is looking for participants to take part in a study “to investigate the experiences of pregnant and postpartum women, and their partners, experiencing stillbirth and neonatal death, both prior to and during the global COVID-19 pandemic.”

It is a multi-country study that hopes to improve care for all families experiencing perinatal loss.

To learn more about the study and get involved, visit the University of British Columbia School of Nursing website.

Sponsored content