Advertisement

Optimism for ‘normal’ summer as B.C. enters phase 2 of vaccine rollout

Click to play video: 'Optimism for ‘normal’ summer as B.C. enters phase 2 of vaccine rollout' Optimism for ‘normal’ summer as B.C. enters phase 2 of vaccine rollout
British Columbians are anxiously awaiting more details on the provinces vaccination roll-out program. – Feb 28, 2021

British Columbians are anxiously awaiting more details on the province’s COVID-19 vaccination roll-out program.

Some of that information will be tabled during a press conference featuring B.C.’s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, on Monday.

Henry recently suggested that British Columbians are getting closer to some semblance of “normal” as the summer rapidly approaches.

Those comments come despite the fact the seven-day rolling average of new cases in the province has been on a steady rise over the past week. On Friday, 521 cases were reported in B.C, the highest tally in six weeks.

Read more: Coronavirus: Steady decline of confirmed cases in Okanagan continues

“By the time we get to the summer, we’re going to be in a different place. In the coming months, we’re going to be able to do all those things that we have been missing for the last year,” Henry said Tuesday.

Story continues below advertisement

Many residents in the Okanagan are hoping that is the case.

“It would be nice to go back to normal,” one resident told Global News.

Another, however, was frustrated by the vaccine rollout so far.

Read more: ‘The faster the better’: Okanagan seniors react to news they’ll soon receive vaccination details

“The government has sat on their thumbs, trying to get the vaccine rolled out. That’s what the problem is, we’re not getting enough vaccine,” he noted.

The next phase for the province is expected to be distributing the three Health-Canada approved vaccines for residents 80 years of age and older.

As of Sunday, B.C. is still in just Phase 1 of its vaccine rollout, which covers residents and staff of long-term care facilities, some health care and some Indigenous communities.

Sponsored content