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Anti-pipeline protesters block rail line near the Burnaby-Coquitlam border

Click to play video: 'Anti-pipeline protestors block rail line near Burnaby-Coquitlam border' Anti-pipeline protestors block rail line near Burnaby-Coquitlam border
WATCH: Anti-pipeline protesters blocked the rail line near the Burnaby-Coquitlam border Tuesday morning -- calling on Ottawa to cancel the Trans Mountain expansion project. Grace Ke has more. – Nov 17, 2020

Anti-pipeline protesters blocked the rail line near the Burnaby-Coquitlam border Tuesday morning calling on Ottawa to cancel the Trans-Mountain expansion project.

Protesters gathered at the intersection of North Road and Trans-Canada Highway, a route that regularly ships oil by rail.

Extinction Rebellion Vancouver, the group behind the protest, said its members stood in solidarity with First Nations and land defenders who are calling for expansion plans to be scrapped.

Click to play video: 'TransMountain pipeline opponents set up rail blockade in Vancouver' TransMountain pipeline opponents set up rail blockade in Vancouver
TransMountain pipeline opponents set up rail blockade in Vancouver – Sep 21, 2020

The federal government bought the pipeline and expansion project in 2018.

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“This is one of those pipelines that will contribute to a crisis that will lead to the death by starvation of millions of people in the next two or three generations,” Extinction Rebellion Vancouver coordinator Zain Haq said.

Click to play video: 'Environmentalists still fighting Trans Mountain pipeline expansion' Environmentalists still fighting Trans Mountain pipeline expansion
Environmentalists still fighting Trans Mountain pipeline expansion – Aug 8, 2020

“Historically, when the government breaks the social contract, the people have the right to break the law… like we saw in the case of the civil rights movement, and we saw in the case of the women’s movement to get voting rights. We’ve reached the point where it’s the only option we have now.”

Read more: Trans Mountain pipeline: A look at key dates in the history of the project

Back in September, Trans Mountain Corp. CEO Ian Anderson said the project was advancing as expected despite challenges including the COVID-19 pandemic, a global slump in demand for fuel, increasing costs, and ongoing protests by opponents.

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— With files from The Canadian Press

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