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Weekly survey: Do you miss album artwork and liner notes?

Our Spring Vinyl Records Sale will be accepting donations on April 11-13, 15-18, 23-27 during the hours of 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. as well as April 17 & 24 from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. What to donate: Records: LPs, 45 & 78 rpm, CDs, CD players, DVD & Blu-Ray movies, DVD & Blu-Ray players, shelf systems, iPod docks & MP3 players, turntables, speakers & wires, receivers & tuners, amplifiers & components, and boom boxes.
Our Spring Vinyl Records Sale will be accepting donations on April 11-13, 15-18, 23-27 during the hours of 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. as well as April 17 & 24 from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. What to donate: Records: LPs, 45 & 78 rpm, CDs, CD players, DVD & Blu-Ray movies, DVD & Blu-Ray players, shelf systems, iPod docks & MP3 players, turntables, speakers & wires, receivers & tuners, amplifiers & components, and boom boxes.

I spent part of the weekend filing records and CDs, a task that should have taken no more than 15 minutes. But it took much longer than that because I kept stopping to look at the artwork and read the liner notes.

That’s when it struck me again: With the rise of digital tracks and streaming, we don’t spend much time–if any!–with album artwork and liner notes.

This used to be a big part of the music experience. I can’t tell you how many times I bought a record or CD simply because it looked good. Yes, sometimes I got burned, but most of the time it turned out to be worth the risk. I also spent countless hours pouring over liner notes while the album played, trying to divine as much information as I could about what I was listening to.

Today, though, this experience has been almost completely removed from music culture. With digital tracks and streaming, we don’t get elaborate artwork and liner notes. So here was the question: Do you miss this? Here are your choices:

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