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U.S. wildfire smoke: Metro Vancouver air quality still a 10+ as advisory remains in place

Click to play video 'Air quality concerns continue as U.S. wildfire smoke blankets much of B.C.' Air quality concerns continue as U.S. wildfire smoke blankets much of B.C.
Air Quality Planner Geoff Doerksen provides an update on the air quality over Metro Vancouver, as winds continue to push in smoke from wildfires burning in Washington State.

Metro Vancouver’s air quality remains off the charts Monday morning, at a 10+ on the air quality scale, while a public advisory has now been in place for a week.

Smoke is extensive across south and central B.C., Global BC meteorologist Mark Madryga said, and due to the lack of rainfall and insignificant airflow, the layers of smoke will likely hold at least through Tuesday.

Click to play video 'West Coast wildfire smoke complicates COVID-19 situation' West Coast wildfire smoke complicates COVID-19 situation
West Coast wildfire smoke complicates COVID-19 situation

More smoke could move in Wednesday and Thursday from the wildfires in Oregon and Washington State, but some much-needed rain is in the forecast for Thursday and Friday, which Madryga said could help to improve air quality.

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Click to play video 'Air quality concerns as U.S. wildfire smoke blankets B.C.' Air quality concerns as U.S. wildfire smoke blankets B.C.
Air quality concerns as U.S. wildfire smoke blankets B.C.

Read more: ‘It’s affecting everybody’: B.C. residents urged to stay indoors, air quality remains among world’s worst

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The good news is that the dense layer of smoke from the weekend has moved past, according to Geoff Doerksen, Metro Vancouver’s air quality planner.

“As that smoke lingers, it will be a little unclear how quickly it will clear out but we do expect some improvements over today and tomorrow,” he told Global News on Monday. “Certainly, the smoke will stick around close to the ground.

“People with medical conditions or infections such as COVID-19 should really postpone or reduce outdoor physical activity until the advisory is lifted.”

Air pollutants can affect infants and the elderly the most, as well as anyone with chronic underlying medical conditions such as diabetes and lung or heart disease.