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Prairies getting hit by a ‘snow train’ this winter, Old Farmer’s Almanac says

Click to play video 'Prairies getting hit by a ‘snow train’ this winter, Old Farmer’s Almanac says' Prairies getting hit by a ‘snow train’ this winter, Old Farmer’s Almanac says
WATCH: The Farmer's Almanacs released their winter predictions this week. Jackie Wilson has details on what may be in store for the prairies and how the forecasts compare.

Various farmer’s almanacs have released their winter predictions and according to the two most popular, the prairies are in for above-average snow.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac forecasts Saskatchewan will get hit by a “snow train”.

Read more: June snowfall on the Okanagan Connector

“That’s not a technical term, but we couldn’t figure out a better way to describe the series of storms we expect to chug through the prairies starting in December and going until March,” said Jack Burnett, the managing editor at the Old Farmer’s Almanac.

Old Farmer’s Almanac: Winter 2020-21
Old Farmer’s Almanac: Winter 2020-21. Photo courtesy of the Old Farmer's Almanac

In exchange for the buckets of snow, the lower two-thirds of Saskatchewan will get above-normal temperatures.

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That’s a different prediction than the Farmer’s Almanacwhich forecasts we’ll get slightly below normal temperatures on top of the added snow.

Farmer’s Almanac: Winter 2020-21
Farmer’s Almanac: Winter 2020-21.

“It’s going to be very cold, in fact a little bit below normal and lots of snow,” said Sandi Duncan, the managing editor at the Farmer’s Almanac.

It’s also going to be a delayed spring with March temperatures well below normal, according to Duncan.

How do the two almanacs develop these predictions?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac was first published in 1792 and is based on climatology, meteorology and solar science.

They also look for replicating weather patterns and anomalies.

Burnett says the publication is also in the last year of a four year trail, where the effects of climate change weighed in. This is based off a locations distance from the North Pole.

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Read more: Frequent, intense snowstorms bad for certain breed of bird: Western University researchers

The Farmer’s Almanac formula is slightly different and top secret, according to Duncan.

“There’s one person that actually knows the true details and formulas. It’s a closely-guarded trade secret,” Duncan said.

“It’s a mathematical and astronomical formula that takes things like sun spot activity, tidal action of the moon, and position of the planets.”

The first publication was in 1818.

Click to play video 'Friends turn snow drift in Saskatoon into snow fort' Friends turn snow drift in Saskatoon into snow fort
Friends turn snow drift in Saskatoon into snow fort