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Saskatchewan WSA says flooding possible with high levels at Anglin Lake

Anglin Lake was risen to a level of 515.58 m, above its natural spill point of 515.42 m due to high moisture levels and precipitation, according to Saskatchewan WSA.
Anglin Lake was risen to a level of 515.58 m, above its natural spill point of 515.42 m due to high moisture levels and precipitation, according to Saskatchewan WSA. File Photo / Global News

Saskatchewan’s Water Security Agency (WSA) is advising downstream stakeholders, including Prince Albert, of high water levels at Anglin Lake.

The lake was risen to a level of 515.58 metres (m), above its natural spill point of 515.42 m, due to high continuing moisture levels and precipitation, according to a press release on Monday.

Read more: 5 people rescued from fast moving South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon

WSA officials said it’s removing additional stop logs to increase the outflow in an attempt to manage the situation, but with many downstream areas already experiencing high flows, flooding may be possible.

High waters level update for Cumberland House/northern Saskatchewan

Flows from the E.B. Campbell Hydroelectric Station near Nipawin will be increasing to roughly 2,165 cubic metres per second (m3/s) over the next day, WSA said on Monday.

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Officials said these increased flows, rainfall, plus the duration and saturation of the area will increase the water levels at Cumberland House. WSA will be determining if there are risks.

High historical levels of precipitation through Churchill System continue to challenge all of northern Saskatchewan, with impacts expected from rainfalls in Alberta and another 40 millimetres predicted for the Reindeer Lake areas.

Peak levels for northern communities such as Ile-a-la-Crosse, La Ronge and Sandy Bay are a projected a week to 10 days off, according to a press release.

Swift running water on river systems present heightened risks

WSA is also advising people of heightened risks involving the North Saskatchewan and Churchill River systems, and their tributaries, as well as the South Saskatchewan River system.

Continued high levels of precipitation on these systems have resulted in swift-moving water, which can pose a hazard surrounding all water-related activities, officials said.

They added caution to be aware of floating debris and high-water velocities.

3 separate drownings in northern Sask., including two 6-year-old boys
3 separate drownings in northern Sask., including two 6-year-old boys