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Teams from across the country make the 2020 Tim Hortons Brier a truly national championship

Click to play video: 'Canadian men’s curling championship truly a “National” event' Canadian men’s curling championship truly a “National” event
WATCH: With 16 treams in attendance, the Canadian men's championship is truly national, making the event a tri-coastal one – Mar 2, 2020

World-class curlers continue to ply their trade in Kingston on Monday, the third day of the 2020 Tim Hortons Brier.

With 16 treams in attendance, the Canadian men’s championship is truly national, making the event a tri-coastal one.

READ MORE: Team Saskatchewan moves to 2-1 at Brier with thrilling win over Team B.C.

“And that’s what differentiates it from many of the curling events out there, is that every province and territory is represented and that’s been kind of the way this event was founded,” said Al Cameron with Curling Canada.

“Back in 1927 you had representatives from every province, you had Northern Ontario sending its own team, and yeah — it’s a coast-to-coast-to-coast championship.”

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Global News anchors agree curling is harder than it looks – Feb 27, 2020

Every part of the country is represented, from British Columbia to Newfoundland and Labrador and all points in between, with rinks from Canada’s territories — Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut — also competing.

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“[It’s] certainly nice to have the opportunity to be here,” said Dale Kohlenberg, who plays third for Team Nunavut. “Under the old system we would have had to play in to qualify and we probably wouldn’t have qualified for this.

“So we look at it as an opportunity to be in the big show and hopefully try to be competitive while we’re here.”

READ MORE: Global Kingston anchors take to the ice — and the brooms and rocks — to learn about curling

Team Nunavut plays out of the Iqaluit Curling Club and Kohlenberg says the sport is definitely gaining traction up north.

“Last year I curled in Yellowknife and it’s a fairly popular sport. I also visited Whitehorse this past winter and it’s extremely popular there,” he said.

“I was very impressed with the enthusiasm there. Iqaluit, not so much; it’s a smaller community. Certainly there’s a hardcore group that comes and shows up, but it doesn’t have the popularity as the other centres of the north have.”

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Click to play video: 'Rocks and Rings program helps students learn how to curl.' Rocks and Rings program helps students learn how to curl.
Rocks and Rings program helps students learn how to curl – Feb 27, 2020

Kohlenberg is hoping that with the team’s appearance here in Kingston for the Brier, that will change.

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