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Taal volcano: Ash blankets roads, rooftops in the Philippines

Philippines’ Taal volcano on the verge of full eruption
WATCH ABOVE: Philippines' Taal volcano on the verge of full eruption

Images from a volcano in the Philippines show lava being spewed into the sky while thick layers of ash cover roads and rooftops of nearby communities.

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Reports of constant trembling caused by the Taal volcano on Tuesday led to warnings of a bigger and more dangerous eruption, as tens of thousands of people fled villages. Those living within 14 kilometres of the volcano — approximately 450,000 people — have been ordered to leave.

A fishing boat sails along a lake as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 12, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines.
A fishing boat sails along a lake as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 12, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
Residents look on as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 12, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines.
Residents look on as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 12, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
A fishing boat sails along a lake as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines.
A fishing boat sails along a lake as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

The volcano, in the middle of a lake in Batangas province south of Manila, rumbled to life Sunday in a powerful explosion that blasted a 15-kilometre column of ash, steam and rock into the sky.

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The government disaster-response agency has not provided details of damage, but reports suggest dozens of houses have been ruined by heavy ash and trembling.

Volcanic ash covers roads and rooftops as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 13, 2020 in Tagaytay city, Cavite province, Philippines.
Volcanic ash covers roads and rooftops as Taal Volcano erupts on Jan. 13, 2020 in Tagaytay city, Cavite province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
Motorists drive through a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 13, 2020 in Lemery, Batangas province, Philippines.
Motorists drive through a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 13, 2020 in Lemery, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
Residents clean rooftops of volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Laurel, Batangas province, Philippines.
Residents clean rooftops of volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Laurel, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Clouds of volcanic ash blowing over Manila, 65 kilometres to the north, closed the country’s main airport Sunday and part of Monday until the ash fall eased.

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Schools continued to be closed in a number of towns and cities, including in Manila, as officials warn of health hazards.

At least six people have been taken to a hospital in Tagaytay city in Cavite due to respiratory ailments caused by the ash, Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said.

Although Taal is one of the world’s smallest active volcanoes, it has a deadly history. It has erupted more than 30 times in the past five centuries, most recently in 1977.

Residents fleeing Taal Volcano’s eruption wait for a ride on the side of a highway on Jan. 13, 2020 in Lemery, Batangas province, Philippines.
Residents fleeing Taal Volcano’s eruption wait for a ride on the side of a highway on Jan. 13, 2020 in Lemery, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
A stray dog walks along a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines.
A stray dog walks along a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
A tricycle drives along a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines.
A tricycle drives along a road covered in volcanic ash from Taal Volcano’s eruption on Jan. 14, 2020 in Talisay, Batangas province, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

An eruption in 1911 killed more than 1,300 people. A 1754 eruption lasted for months.

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The Philippines lies on the “Ring of Fire,” a belt of volcanoes circling the Pacific Ocean that is also prone to earthquakes.

READ MORE: Tens of thousands flee as red-hot lava gushes from volcano near Manila

It’s not just the ash, trembling and possible eruptions that pose a threat to those nearby. CNN reported Wednesday that the situation brings the potential for mudslides caused by rain and ash mixing. A tsunami could also be triggered by volcanic activity.

— With files from The Associated Press and Reuters