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Confused by fad diets? Registered holistic nutritionist has advice

Click to play video 'Confused by fad diets? Registered holistic nutritionist has advice' Confused by fad diets? Registered holistic nutritionist has advice
WATCH ABOVE: Now that the festivities are over it’s the perfect time to hit the reset button. Susan Hay gets expert advice from Julie Mancuso, a registered holistic nutritionist on how to sustain healthy eating habits this new year.

It seems the abundance of food and drink from the holidays has many people thinking about setting some personal goals around health and fitness in 2020.

So if you made a resolution around losing weight, registered holistic nutritionist and counsellor Julie Mancuso has advice to help you hit the reset button.

“People often resort to various fads and/or diets as quick fixes to lose weight, particularly in the new year,” explained Mancuso.

READ MORE: Here’s why fad diets don’t work – explained in two simple charts

“Fads come and go, and their results are rarely sustainable in the long-term.”

What are some of these fads? Mancuso said the three most recent weight loss fads are as follows: keto diet, plant-based diet, and intermittent fasting.

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“There are pros and cons from each one,” said Mancuso.

“An alternative would be a wholesome, nutritionally-balanced, sustainable method that can result in healthy and permanent weight loss.”

For some, it’s a simple matter of adjustments to the foods portions which, in many cases, are disproportionate.

“Typically, many people tend to eat too many carbs in proportion to vegetables and sources of protein,” she explained.

“Learning about the proper proportions of these can go a long way in achieving some form of balance.”

Mancuso recommended the now-standard 50 per cent or even slightly more of a variety of nutrient-rich and fibre-laden vegetables, approximately 30 per cent of lean protein – aimed at keeping you full for longer, and the rest can be devoted to carbs such as brown rice, sweet potatoes, and quinoa.

READ MORE: This is what crash diets do to your body — and there are healthier ways to lose weight, anyway

“Fats, the healthy ones, should be dispersed throughout as well,” added Mancuso.

So what’s the bottom line?

“Each case is different because we are all different. This is precisely the reason why man fad diets fail,” Mancuso said.

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“Thorough personalization is what sets the stage for healthy weight loss, not a one-size-fits-all approach.”

Mancuso recommended educating yourself first with reliable choices online or by visiting your neighbourhood nutritionist or dietitian.