July 9, 2019 11:25 am
Updated: July 17, 2019 5:23 pm

630 CHED Oilers Now Legends of the Game: Dwayne Roloson

Edmonton Oilers' Dwayne Roloson makes a glove save against the Vancouver Canucks during the second period of NHL hockey action at Edmonton's Rexall Place on Thursday, March 20, 2008.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Ulan
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Every Wednesday throughout the summer, 630 CHED Oilers Now with Bob Stauffer is bringing you stories from the game like you’ve never heard before.

Starting at 12:30 p.m., Legends of the Game will bring you behind-the-scenes stories from players, broadcasters and those whose names have become synonymous with the game of hockey.

READ MORE: Hundreds gather to see St. Louis Blues coach bring Stanley Cup to small Alberta community

From triumph to tragedy, to humor, heartbreak and heroism, Legends of the Game aims to peel back the curtain on stories you won’t find anywhere else.

Dwayne Roloson

Oh what could’ve been if Dwayne Roloson wasn’t injured in game one of the 2006 Stanley Cup Final.

That said, many would suggest the Simcoe, Ont. native was the main reason the Oilers were even in the final in the first place.

LISTEN BELOW: Legends of the Game on 630 CHED Oilers Now with guest Dwayne Roloson

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Oilers general manager Kevin Lowe acquired Roloson from Minnesota on March 8, 2006 for a first-round draft pick, and had a 12-5 record in the playoffs for Edmonton that year. Many considered him a front-runner for the Conn Symthe Trophy, awarded to the most valuable player of the playoffs.

The dream was shattered in Game One against Carolina, however, as Hurricanes forward Andrew Ladd was driven into the net by Oilers defenceman Marc-Andre Bergeron, causing a collision with Roloson that resulted in a grade-three MCL sprain and ended Roloson’s playoffs.

Edmonton Oilers Marc-Andre Bergeron right, pushes Carolina Hurricanes Andrew Ladd into goalie Dwayne Roloson during third period of the first game of NHL Stanley Cup final in Raleigh, NC Monday June 5, 2006. Carolina won 5-4.

CP PHOTO/Paul Chiasson

The Oilers would ultimately lose in game seven with the goaltending tandem of Jussi Markkanen and Ty Conklin unable to finish what Roloson started. He finished the playoffs with a 2.33 goals against average and a .927 save percentage — admirable number from any goaltender.

“Rolie the Goalie” signed for three more years in Edmonton after that, never tasting playoff action again before leaving as a free agent in 2009.

In his four seasons with the Oilers, Roloson had a 78-82-25 regular season record.

Despite a reasonably short tenure, his legacy has been left on the Oilers franchise.

Ken Hitchcock

Ken Hitchcock got his start coaching Midget hockey in Sherwood Park in the early 1980s before the WHL’s Kamloops Blazers offered him a job in the junior ranks.

From there, Hitchcock coached the Blazers to four division titles and two Memorial Cup appearances, receiving the CHL’s Coach of the Year award in 1990.

LISTEN BELOW: Legends of the Game on 630 CHED Oilers Now with guest Ken Hitchcock

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Hitchcock made the jump to the NHL as an assistant with the Philadelphia Flyers in 1990, spending three season there. He was named the head coach of the Dallas Stars in January on 1996 and won his only Stanley Cup there in 1999.

Edmonton Oilers head coach Ken Hitchcock looks on during an NHL hockey game against the Montreal Canadiens in Montreal, Sunday, February 3, 2019.

THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Graham Hughes

“Hitch,” as he’s affectionately known, had stops in Columbus, St. Louis and Edmonton after that, and won the Jack Adam’s Trophy as the NHL’s top coach with St. Louis in 2012.

He is third in all-time wins by an NHL coach behind Scottie Bowman and Joel Quenneville and has an 849-534-88-127 record over 1598 games behind an NHL bench.

READ MORE: Edmonton Oilers fire head coach Todd McLellan, hire Ken Hitchcock

He was named to the Order of Hockey in Canada this past year.

 

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