December 16, 2018 7:17 pm
Updated: December 17, 2018 6:22 pm

Trump asks if ‘SNL’ is legal day after skit that imagines Clinton won U.S. election

WATCH: In a star-studded 'It's a Wonderful Life' spoof, SNL asks 'What if Trump were never elected?'

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U.S. President Donald Trump raged against Saturday Night Live on Sunday after the show aired a skit imagining a world where Trump was never president and Hillary Clinton had won the election instead.

READ MORE: ‘Saturday Night Live’ imagines a world where Trump never was president

“A REAL scandal is the one sided coverage, hour by hour, of networks like NBC & Democrat spin machines like Saturday Night Live,” Trump tweeted. “It is all nothing less than unfair news coverage and Dem commercials. Should be tested in courts, can’t be legal?”

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The skit on Saturday was a spoof of It’s a Wonderful Life, in which an angel named Clarence, played by Kenan Thompson, takes Trump, played by Alec Baldwin, to a party where all of his affiliates are doing well because Trump never became president.

In the skit, Eric Trump is smart because he now has time to attend adult education, Melania Trump has no accent because being around Trump before had hurt her language skills and U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence has now pursued his true career calling as a DJ. Matt Damon also made an appearance again as Brett Kavanaugh, who is free to party as much as he likes now that he is not a Supreme Court Justice.

WATCH: Trump loses his patience with the ‘hostile media’

Trump, who has referred to the media as the “enemy of the people,” has lashed out at SNL before. In 2016, he tweeted about SNL on multiple occasions, accusing the show of being part of a larger media conspiracy aimed to prevent him from becoming president and criticizing Baldwin’s portrayal of him.

“Watched Saturday Night Live hit job on me. Time to retire the boring and unfunny show,” Trump tweeted at the time. “Alec Baldwin portrayal stinks. Media rigging election!”

Trump has hosted SNL twice before in 2004 and 2015.

In response to Trump wondering whether SNL‘s portrayal of him is legal, many commented on Twitter that the First Amendment protects freedom of speech, including satire and parody.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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