November 9, 2018 2:02 pm
Updated: November 9, 2018 4:59 pm

Salons continue calls for hair donations after Canadian Cancer Society says it will stop

WATCH: The Canadian Cancer Society has announced that they will no longer be accepting donations or hair after Dec. 31. But as Alicia Draus reports, some say there is still a need for real hair wigs, and other organizations are continuing to collect donations.

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The Canadian Cancer Society has announced that they will no longer be accepting hair donations after Dec. 31.

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, they have enough hair to keep making wigs until 2022.

“In recent years, synthetic-hair technology has vastly improved, giving synthetic hair wigs more of a ‘real-hair’ feel, making them lighter and cooler to wear and easier to style,” the society said in a statement

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READ MORE: ‘It makes me sad’: Canadian Cancer Society no longer accepting hair donations

Devera Graves is the owner of Ultra Hair Solutions and works with Angel Hair for Kids, which provides kids in need with real hair wigs at no cost.

“I’m seeing a constant influx and constant look for human hair,” she said.

“Especially with the young kids going through cancer. They’re wanting to curl their hair, they want to flat iron, they want to feel pretty and they want to be able to play with their hair, so there’s definitely a need.”

In addition to chemotherapy patients, Angel Hair for Kids also helps those with alopecia, an autoimmune disorder that causes a person to lose their hair, as well as those with trichotillomania, a hair-pulling disorder.

“It’s a self-esteem thing,” Graves said about being fitted with a wig.

“It’s confidence, it’s giving that feel good back to the clients.”

Graves acknowledged that synthetic wigs have come a long way, but she said many people feel more natural in a real hair wig, which they can treat and play with as if it was their own.

“I even offer my chemo clients, if they just want to come in and just feel apart of going to the salon, I tell them to come in and let me wash your hair and let’s make it look pretty.”

WATCH: Help pours in for children hit by wig store theft

It takes 10 donated ponytails to create a single real hair wig, which can retail from $1,500 and up.

Graves said people who want to help can do so by donating either cash or their hair. She said she wants people to know that even though the Canadian Cancer Society will stop collecting donations the need is not going away.

“Please continue to donate your hair,” she said.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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